Determining the ‘local’ 87Sr/86Sr range for archaeological skeletons: a case study from Neolithic Europe. Bentley, R., Price, T., & Stephan, E. Journal of Archaeological Science, 31(4):365–375, April, 2004.
Determining the ‘local’ 87Sr/86Sr range for archaeological skeletons: a case study from Neolithic Europe [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Measurement of strontium isotopes in archaeological skeletons is an effective technique for characterizing prehistoric mobility. However, interpretation of the results can be highly sensitive to small changes in the determined ‘local’ 87Sr/86Sr signature at an archaeological site. Because the local range is often defined as within 2 s.d. from the mean 87Sr/86Sr value in archaeological human bones, the susceptibility of bones to diagenesis may lead to significant overestimates in the number of ‘non-locals’ at a particular site. Tooth enamel, on the other hand, is highly resistant to postmortem biochemical alteration, and it is found that 87Sr/86Sr in archaeological enamel samples from animals of Neolithic Germany provide a useful alternative estimate for the local range.
@article{bentley_determining_2004,
	title = {Determining the ‘local’ {87Sr}/{86Sr} range for archaeological skeletons: a case study from {Neolithic} {Europe}},
	volume = {31},
	issn = {03054403},
	shorttitle = {Determining the ‘local’ {87Sr}/{86Sr} range for archaeological skeletons},
	url = {https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S030544030300133X},
	doi = {10.1016/j.jas.2003.09.003},
	abstract = {Measurement of strontium isotopes in archaeological skeletons is an effective technique for characterizing prehistoric mobility. However, interpretation of the results can be highly sensitive to small changes in the determined ‘local’ 87Sr/86Sr signature at an archaeological site. Because the local range is often defined as within 2 s.d. from the mean 87Sr/86Sr value in archaeological human bones, the susceptibility of bones to diagenesis may lead to significant overestimates in the number of ‘non-locals’ at a particular site. Tooth enamel, on the other hand, is highly resistant to postmortem biochemical alteration, and it is found that 87Sr/86Sr in archaeological enamel samples from animals of Neolithic Germany provide a useful alternative estimate for the local range.},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2021-05-07},
	journal = {Journal of Archaeological Science},
	author = {Bentley, R.Alexander and Price, T.Douglas and Stephan, Elisabeth},
	month = apr,
	year = {2004},
	pages = {365--375},
}

Downloads: 0