Ecological Palaeoecology and Conservation Biology: Controversies, Challenges, and Compromises. Birks 8(4):292–304.
Ecological Palaeoecology and Conservation Biology: Controversies, Challenges, and Compromises [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Until recently, ecological palaeoecology (a part of long-term ecology) and conservation biology were considered two separate subjects with little relevance to each other. With the shift from description and evaluation in conservation biology in the 1960s?1990s to the paradigm of ?conservation in a rapidly changing world? in the late 1990s, conservationists began to realise the importance of the temporal dimension in developing conservation strategies to allow for landscape and ecosystem change. Despite this paradigm shift, ecological palaeoecology is still largely ignored by conservation biology. I explore why this may be and outline recent advances in the subject of direct relevance to conservation science. I present nine questions of critical importance to conservation that palaeoecology can answer. Inevitably during this honeymoon phase of conservation biology and palaeoecology, there are controversies, challenges, and compromises. I outline these and suggest how some can be overcome by breakdown of the largely artificial boundaries between landscape history, cultural history, conservation, and palaeoecology, and by the appreciation that all can make important contributions to our understanding of people and nature and conservation in the face of changing land-use, environment, and landscapes.
@article{birksEcologicalPalaeoecologyConservation2012,
  title = {Ecological Palaeoecology and Conservation Biology: Controversies, Challenges, and Compromises},
  author = {{Birks}},
  date = {2012-07},
  journaltitle = {International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services \& Management},
  volume = {8},
  pages = {292--304},
  doi = {10.1080/21513732.2012.701667},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1080/21513732.2012.701667},
  abstract = {Until recently, ecological palaeoecology (a part of long-term ecology) and conservation biology were considered two separate subjects with little relevance to each other. With the shift from description and evaluation in conservation biology in the 1960s?1990s to the paradigm of ?conservation in a rapidly changing world? in the late 1990s, conservationists began to realise the importance of the temporal dimension in developing conservation strategies to allow for landscape and ecosystem change. Despite this paradigm shift, ecological palaeoecology is still largely ignored by conservation biology. I explore why this may be and outline recent advances in the subject of direct relevance to conservation science. I present nine questions of critical importance to conservation that palaeoecology can answer. Inevitably during this honeymoon phase of conservation biology and palaeoecology, there are controversies, challenges, and compromises. I outline these and suggest how some can be overcome by breakdown of the largely artificial boundaries between landscape history, cultural history, conservation, and palaeoecology, and by the appreciation that all can make important contributions to our understanding of people and nature and conservation in the face of changing land-use, environment, and landscapes.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13759415,~to-add-doi-URL,conservation-biology,paleoecology},
  number = {4}
}
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