Mind the Gap: How Open Were European Primeval Forests?. Birks, H. J. B. 20(4):154–156.
Mind the Gap: How Open Were European Primeval Forests? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
There are two competing hypotheses about the structure and dynamics of primeval forests in lowland Europe: the high-forest and the wood-pasture hypotheses, both of which influence current European forest conservation policies. In a recent study using pollen-analytical data from across lowland Europe, Mitchell provides support for rejecting the wood-pasture hypothesis. His study is important for future forest management planning and for showing how hypotheses about large herbivores as biotic factors can be tested using palaeoecological data.
@article{birksMindGapHow2005,
  title = {Mind the Gap: How Open Were {{European}} Primeval Forests?},
  author = {Birks, H. J. B.},
  date = {2005-04},
  journaltitle = {Trends in Ecology \& Evolution},
  volume = {20},
  pages = {154--156},
  issn = {0169-5347},
  doi = {10.1016/j.tree.2005.02.001},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2005.02.001},
  abstract = {There are two competing hypotheses about the structure and dynamics of primeval forests in lowland Europe: the high-forest and the wood-pasture hypotheses, both of which influence current European forest conservation policies. In a recent study using pollen-analytical data from across lowland Europe, Mitchell provides support for rejecting the wood-pasture hypothesis. His study is important for future forest management planning and for showing how hypotheses about large herbivores as biotic factors can be tested using palaeoecological data.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13774263,~to-add-doi-URL,europe,forest-management,forest-resources,paleoecology},
  number = {4}
}
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