Paleoecology. Birks, H. J. B. In Encyclopedia of Ecology, pages 2623–2634. Elsevier.
Paleoecology [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Paleoecology is the ecology of the past. It is mainly concerned with reconstructing past biota, populations, communities, landscapes, environments, and ecosystems from available geological and biological (fossil) evidence. There are two major types of paleoecology: Quaternary paleoecology, concerned with the last 2.8 million years of Earth's history, and deep-time palaeoecology, based on fossils from pre-Quaternary sediments over a wide range of timescales. The major philosophical concepts in paleoecology are simplicity, the method of multiple working hypotheses, and methodological uniformitarianism. There is a wide range of types of paleoecological evidence, including individual fossils, assemblages of fossils, sediment inorganic and organic geochemistry, isotopic composition of fossils and sediments, and sediment lithology. There are nine main stages in Quaternary paleoecological studies. Interpretation of paleoecological data primarily concerns paleoecological reconstructions and ecological explanations for observed changes. There are many examples of Quaternary paleoecological contributions to our understanding of ecological systems. Exciting future developments in paleoecology are likely to occur as a result of major advances in Earth sciences and in the reconstruction of past environments from nonbiological evidence.
@incollection{birksPaleoecology2008,
  title = {Paleoecology},
  booktitle = {Encyclopedia of {{Ecology}}},
  author = {Birks, H. J. B.},
  editor = {Jørgensen, S. E.},
  date = {2008},
  pages = {2623--2634},
  publisher = {{Elsevier}},
  doi = {10.1016/b978-008045405-4.00525-5},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/b978-008045405-4.00525-5},
  abstract = {Paleoecology is the ecology of the past. It is mainly concerned with reconstructing past biota, populations, communities, landscapes, environments, and ecosystems from available geological and biological (fossil) evidence. There are two major types of paleoecology: Quaternary paleoecology, concerned with the last 2.8 million years of Earth's history, and deep-time palaeoecology, based on fossils from pre-Quaternary sediments over a wide range of timescales. The major philosophical concepts in paleoecology are simplicity, the method of multiple working hypotheses, and methodological uniformitarianism. There is a wide range of types of paleoecological evidence, including individual fossils, assemblages of fossils, sediment inorganic and organic geochemistry, isotopic composition of fossils and sediments, and sediment lithology. There are nine main stages in Quaternary paleoecological studies. Interpretation of paleoecological data primarily concerns paleoecological reconstructions and ecological explanations for observed changes. There are many examples of Quaternary paleoecological contributions to our understanding of ecological systems. Exciting future developments in paleoecology are likely to occur as a result of major advances in Earth sciences and in the reconstruction of past environments from nonbiological evidence.},
  isbn = {978-0-08-045405-4},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13774296,~to-add-doi-URL,community,ecology,paleoecology,quaternary}
}
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