Lake features, water quality and the summer distribution of Common Loons in New Hampshire. Blair, R. Journal of Field Ornithology, 63(1):1-9, 1992.
abstract   bibtex   
Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between 37 lake- and water-quality characteristics and the summer presence or absence of Common Loons (Gavia iraruer) on 87 lakes in New Hampshire. The goal was to determine whether these char- acteristics differed between lakes occupied and not occupied by loons, and whether these characteristics could be used to predict the occurrence of loons on lakes. The results indicate that, in contrast to non-occupied lakes, loons frequented lakes that had significantly larger surface areas and sampling site depths. Also, these lakes were clearer, warmer and less productive. The individual best predictors of loon use of a lake, in decreasing order of importance, were lake area, iron, surface temperature and sampling-site depth.
@article{
 title = {Lake features, water quality and the summer distribution of Common Loons in New Hampshire},
 type = {article},
 year = {1992},
 pages = {1-9},
 volume = {63},
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 abstract = {Logistic regression was used to analyze the association between 37 lake- and water-quality characteristics and the summer presence or absence of Common Loons (Gavia iraruer) on 87 lakes in New Hampshire. The goal was to determine whether these char- acteristics differed between lakes occupied and not occupied by loons, and whether these characteristics could be used to predict the occurrence of loons on lakes. The results indicate that, in contrast to non-occupied lakes, loons frequented lakes that had significantly larger surface areas and sampling site depths. Also, these lakes were clearer, warmer and less productive. The individual best predictors of loon use of a lake, in decreasing order of importance, were lake area, iron, surface temperature and sampling-site depth.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Blair, R.B.},
 journal = {Journal of Field Ornithology},
 number = {1}
}
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