Microbial communities among the dominant high marsh plants and associated sediments of the United States East Coast. Blum, L., Roberts, M. S., Garland, J. L., & Mills, A. L. Microbial Ecology, 2004.
abstract   bibtex   
Microbial communities in the sediment and associated with the dominant type of standing dead plant were collected from the high marsh zone of ten sites along the eastern coast of the United States from Maine to Florida. Microbial community composition was examined using T-RFLP, and bacterial and fungal abundance was determined microscopically. Within the sediment, community composition was strongly correlated with latitude, indicating that biogeographical factors are important determinants of sediment community composition, while abundance was positively and strongly correlated with sediment organic matter content. A strong biogeographical effect was observed for both bacterial and fungal abundance on standing dead plants, but there was no clear relationship between community composition and latitude. Microbial community composition was more similar among plants of the same type (i.e., related plant species) suggesting that plant type (i.e., substrate quality) is primarily responsible for the determining community composition on standing dead plants. The results of this work suggest that the trajectory of microbial succession during standing dead decomposition differs among plant types even though the fundamental decay processes are similar.
@article{blum_microbial_2004,
	title = {Microbial communities among the dominant high marsh plants and associated  sediments of the {United} {States} {East} {Coast}},
	volume = {48},
	abstract = {Microbial communities in the sediment and associated with the dominant type  of standing dead plant were collected from the high marsh zone of ten sites  along the eastern coast of the United States from Maine to Florida. Microbial  community composition was examined using T-RFLP, and bacterial and fungal  abundance was determined microscopically. Within the sediment, community  composition was strongly correlated with latitude, indicating that  biogeographical factors are important determinants of sediment community  composition, while abundance was positively and strongly correlated with  sediment organic matter content. A strong biogeographical effect was observed  for both bacterial and fungal abundance on standing dead plants, but there was  no clear relationship between community composition and latitude. Microbial  community composition was more similar among plants of the same type (i.e.,  related plant species) suggesting that plant type (i.e., substrate quality) is  primarily responsible for the determining community composition on standing dead  plants. The results of this work suggest that the trajectory of microbial  succession during standing dead decomposition differs among plant types even  though the fundamental decay processes are similar.},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Microbial Ecology},
	author = {Blum, L.K. and Roberts, M. S. and Garland, J. L. and Mills, A. L.},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {VCR, fungi, bacteria, decomposition, organic matter, synthesis, microbial community, mainland, standing-dead marsh grass}
}

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