Reply to Feeley and Machovina: Trophic Ecology Complements Estimates of Land Use Change Due to Food Production. Bonhommeau, S.; Nieblas, A.; Chassot, E.; Kaplan, D. M.; Dubroca, L.; Manacorda, C.; Barde, J.; and Le Pape, O. 111(9):E795.
Reply to Feeley and Machovina: Trophic Ecology Complements Estimates of Land Use Change Due to Food Production [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] Feeley and Machovina assert that even though humans occupy a low trophic level, we have larger ecosystem impacts than any other species because of the sheer volume of food consumed (linked to population size) and the inefficiency of its production (1). The authors argue that large differences in the impact on resource use exist between dietary preferences (e.g., differing proportions of beef, pork, or poultry in a diet), even if human diets are represented by the same trophic level. We are in complete agreement that humans have among the largest ecological impact of any species and that the human trophic level (HTL) (2) does not capture all aspects of these impacts, in particular, variations in dietary preferences of the same HTL. [...]
@article{bonhommeauReplyFeeleyMachovina2014,
  title = {Reply to {{Feeley}} and {{Machovina}}: Trophic Ecology Complements Estimates of Land Use Change Due to Food Production},
  author = {Bonhommeau, Sylvain and Nieblas, Anne-Elise and Chassot, Emmanuel and Kaplan, David M. and Dubroca, Laurent and Manacorda, Carlos and Barde, Julien and Le Pape, Olivier},
  date = {2014-03},
  journaltitle = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  volume = {111},
  pages = {E795},
  issn = {1091-6490},
  doi = {10.1073/pnas.1324144111},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1324144111},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] Feeley and Machovina assert that even though humans occupy a low trophic level, we have larger ecosystem impacts than any other species because of the sheer volume of food consumed (linked to population size) and the inefficiency of its production (1). The authors argue that large differences in the impact on resource use exist between dietary preferences (e.g., differing proportions of beef, pork, or poultry in a diet), even if human diets are represented by the same trophic level.

We are in complete agreement that humans have among the largest ecological impact of any species and that the human trophic level (HTL) (2) does not capture all aspects of these impacts, in particular, variations in dietary preferences of the same HTL. [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13095117,anthropogenic-impacts,ecology,food-security,food-web,global-change,global-scale,multiauthor},
  number = {9}
}
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