Information policies and higher education choices experimental evidence from Colombia. Bonilla-Mejía, L., Bottan, N. L., & Ham, A. Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics, 83:101468, 2019.
Information policies and higher education choices experimental evidence from Colombia [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper studies the effects of a large-scale information policy that nudges high school students towards college information websites in Colombia. We collect panel data on 6000 students in 115 public schools and match them to administrative records. Students in 58 randomly-chosen schools received a 35-minute presentation on the earning premiums of college, funding opportunities to cover costs, and the importance of test scores for admissions and financial aid. Our findings indicate that students learn about financial aid but do not update their inflated beliefs about college earnings, are not motivated to improve academic performance, nor substantially modify their enrollment choices. These results are precisely estimated, robust, and consistent with the related literature. We conduct an in-depth analysis of the reasons driving the limited effects of information provision on higher education choices, identifying factors that may increase the effectiveness of these policies to motivate the demand for college.
@article{BONILLAMEJIA2019101468,
title = {Information policies and higher education choices experimental evidence from Colombia},
journal = {Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics},
volume = {83},
pages = {101468},
year = {2019},
issn = {2214-8043},
doi = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socec.2019.101468},
url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214804318304245},
author = {Leonardo Bonilla-Mejía and Nicolas L. Bottan and Andrés Ham},
keywords = {Nudges, Information policies, Knowledge, Expectations, Higher education choices},
abstract = {This paper studies the effects of a large-scale information policy that nudges high school students towards college information websites in Colombia. We collect panel data on 6000 students in 115 public schools and match them to administrative records. Students in 58 randomly-chosen schools received a 35-minute presentation on the earning premiums of college, funding opportunities to cover costs, and the importance of test scores for admissions and financial aid. Our findings indicate that students learn about financial aid but do not update their inflated beliefs about college earnings, are not motivated to improve academic performance, nor substantially modify their enrollment choices. These results are precisely estimated, robust, and consistent with the related literature. We conduct an in-depth analysis of the reasons driving the limited effects of information provision on higher education choices, identifying factors that may increase the effectiveness of these policies to motivate the demand for college.}
}

Downloads: 0