Ash Species in Europe: Biological Characteristics and Practical Guidelines for Sustainable Use. Boshier, D.; Cordero, J.; Harris, S.; Pannell, J.; Rendell, S.; Savill, P.; Stewart, J.; Cundall, N.; Hubert, J.; Samuel, S.; Eriksen, B.; Wallander, E.; Martinsson, O.; Bellido, J. A.; Fayos, P. G.; López, R. M.; Roldán, M.; Verdú, M.; Mateu, I.; Montilla, A. I.; Spanos, K.; Kyriakidis, D.; Papi, R.; Blada, I.; Palada, M.; Popescu, F.; Postolache, D.; Canova, I.; Durkovic, J.; Gömöry, D.; Krajmerová, D.; Paule, L.; and Slobodńık, B. Oxford Forestry Institute, University of Oxford.
Ash Species in Europe: Biological Characteristics and Practical Guidelines for Sustainable Use [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
This book is about the three ash (Fraxinus) species native to Europe: Fraxinus excelsior L. (common ash), F. angustifolia Vahl (narrow-leaved ash) and F. ornus L. (manna ash). Its aim is to summarise the findings of FRAXIGEN, a research project funded under the Fifth Framework Programme (Biodiversity and Ecosystems) of the European Union from January 2002 to June 2005. It intends to draw out key conclusions and recommendations of relevance to both policy makers and field practitioners, including forest owners and managers, tree nursery operators, and seed collectors. Scientists from ten institutions across Europe worked in close collaboration to address the same research questions relating to the three European ash species in different parts of their distributions. The objectives of FRAXIGEN were: 1. To study patterns of gene flow and genetic diversity in the three European Fraxinus species, and how these are influenced by variation in reproductive biology. The studies of GENETIC DIVERSITY and GENE FLOW used NEUTRAL VARIATION using GENETIC MARKERS, while the work on reproductive biology included both studies of the MATING SYSTEM using controlled pollinations, and detailed studies of the species' PHENOLOGY. 2. To study how natural ash populations have adapted to their environment, and how selection by humans for productive characters has affected adaptive variation. This was addressed through RECIPROCAL TRANSPLANT EXPERIMENTS: networks of field trials specifically designed to investigate localised adaptation and the scale over which it operates. 3. To provide guidance for governmental, private and public interest groups on the collection, exploitation, and conservation of ash genetic resources. This was done by using findings from all the studies. The methods used for these studies were standardised as far as possible across the different sites, to make the results comparable. The project's scientific approach is outlined in Chapter 3. The results of the studies are summarised in the species chapters (Chapters 4-6).
@book{boshierAshSpeciesEurope2005,
  title = {Ash Species in {{Europe}}: Biological Characteristics and Practical Guidelines for Sustainable Use},
  author = {Boshier, David and Cordero, Jesús and Harris, Stephen and Pannell, John and Rendell, Sarah and Savill, Peter and Stewart, Janet and Cundall, Ned and Hubert, Jason and Samuel, Sam and Eriksen, Bente and Wallander, Eva and Martinsson, Owe and Bellido, Jose A. and Fayos, Patricio G. and López, Rosa M. and Roldán, Marta and Verdú, Miguel and Mateu, Isabel and Montilla, Ana I. and Spanos, Konstantinos and Kyriakidis, Dimitris and Papi, Rigini and Blada, Ioan and Palada, Magdalena and Popescu, Flaviu and Postolache, Dragos and Canova, Ingrid and Durkovic, Jaroslav and Gömöry, Dušan and Krajmerová, Diana and Paule, Ladislav and Slobodńık, Branko},
  date = {2005},
  publisher = {{Oxford Forestry Institute, University of Oxford}},
  location = {{United Kingdom}},
  url = {http://www.worldcat.org/isbn/0850741637},
  abstract = {This book is about the three ash (Fraxinus) species native to Europe: Fraxinus excelsior L. (common ash), F. angustifolia Vahl (narrow-leaved ash) and F. ornus L. (manna ash). Its aim is to summarise the findings of FRAXIGEN, a research project funded under the Fifth Framework Programme (Biodiversity and Ecosystems) of the European Union from January 2002 to June 2005. It intends to draw out key conclusions and recommendations of relevance to both policy makers and field practitioners, including forest owners and managers, tree nursery operators, and seed collectors. Scientists from ten institutions across Europe worked in close collaboration to address the same research questions relating to the three European ash species in different parts of their distributions. The objectives of FRAXIGEN were: 1. To study patterns of gene flow and genetic diversity in the three European Fraxinus species, and how these are influenced by variation in reproductive biology. The studies of GENETIC DIVERSITY and GENE FLOW used NEUTRAL VARIATION using GENETIC MARKERS, while the work on reproductive biology included both studies of the MATING SYSTEM using controlled pollinations, and detailed studies of the species' PHENOLOGY. 2. To study how natural ash populations have adapted to their environment, and how selection by humans for productive characters has affected adaptive variation. This was addressed through RECIPROCAL TRANSPLANT EXPERIMENTS: networks of field trials specifically designed to investigate localised adaptation and the scale over which it operates. 3. To provide guidance for governmental, private and public interest groups on the collection, exploitation, and conservation of ash genetic resources. This was done by using findings from all the studies. The methods used for these studies were standardised as far as possible across the different sites, to make the results comparable. The project's scientific approach is outlined in Chapter 3. The results of the studies are summarised in the species chapters (Chapters 4-6).},
  isbn = {0-85074-163-7},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13130220,europe,forest-resources,fraxinus-augustifolia,fraxinus-excelsior,fraxinus-ornus,fraxinus-spp,multiauthor,sustainability}
}
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