Functional Integration of Newborn Neurons in the Zebrafish Optic Tectum. Boulanger-Weill, J. & Sumbre, G. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 7:57, April, 2019.
Functional Integration of Newborn Neurons in the Zebrafish Optic Tectum [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   1 download  
Neurogenesis persists during adulthood in restricted parts of the vertebrate brain. In the optic tectum (OT) of the zebrafish larva, newborn neurons are continuously added and contribute to visual information processing. Recent studies have started to describe the functional development and fate of newborn neurons in the OT. Like the mammalian brain, newborn neurons in the OT require sensory inputs for their integration into local networks and survival. Recent findings suggest that the functional development of newborn neurons requires both activity-dependent and hard-wired mechanisms for proper circuit integration. Here, we review these findings and argue that the study of neurogenesis in non-mammalian species will help elucidate the general mechanisms of circuit assembly following neurogenesis.
@article{boulanger-weill_functional_2019,
	title = {Functional {Integration} of {Newborn} {Neurons} in the {Zebrafish} {Optic} {Tectum}},
	volume = {7},
	copyright = {Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC-BY-NC-SA)},
	issn = {2296-634X},
	url = {https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fcell.2019.00057/full},
	doi = {10.3389/fcell.2019.00057},
	abstract = {Neurogenesis persists during adulthood in restricted parts of the vertebrate brain. In the optic tectum (OT) of the zebrafish larva, newborn neurons are continuously added and contribute to visual information processing. Recent studies have started to describe the functional development and fate of newborn neurons in the OT. Like the mammalian brain, newborn neurons in the OT require sensory inputs for their integration into local networks and survival. Recent findings suggest that the functional development of newborn neurons requires both activity-dependent and hard-wired mechanisms for proper circuit integration. Here, we review these findings and argue that the study of neurogenesis in non-mammalian species will help elucidate the general mechanisms of circuit assembly following neurogenesis.},
	urldate = {2019-04-04},
	journal = {Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology},
	author = {Boulanger-Weill, Jonathan and Sumbre, Germán},
	month = apr,
	year = {2019},
	pages = {57},
}

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