Inuence of Dissolved Organic Carbon , pH , and Microbia Respiration Rates on Mercury Methylation and Demethylation in Lake Water. Brenda, M., Rudd, J., W., M., & Kelly, C., A. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 49(1):17-22, 1992.
Inuence of Dissolved Organic Carbon , pH , and Microbia Respiration Rates on Mercury Methylation and Demethylation in Lake Water [pdf]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Effects of changes in DOC concentrations, pH, and microbial respiration rates on specific rates of mercury methylation and demethylation in lake water were studied using radioisotopic techniques. Increased concentrations of DOC resulted in decreased specific rates of net methylation, possibly as a result of complexation of inorganic mercury with DOC. A reduction in pH from 7.0 to 5.0 had the greatest effect, causing large to moderate increases in net methylation rate at both low and high DOC concentrations (500–2600 μM). Rates of respiration (indicative of general rates of microbial activity), which were insensitive to pH change over the range tested (5.0–7.0), had the smallest effect on net methyl mercury production rates. We propose the following explanations for three situations in which high mercury concentrations are commonly found in fish. (1) in acidified dilute clear-water lakes, high fish mercury concentrations may be a result of enhanced in-lake methylation; (2) in brown-water circumneutral lakes, where in-lake methylation is inhibited by high DOC concentrations, terrestrial inputs of methyl mercury may be most important; and (3) in brown-water, low-pH lakes, both in-lake and terrestrial sources of methyl mercury may contribute to elevated mercury concentrations in fish.
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 title = {Inuence of Dissolved Organic Carbon , pH , and Microbia Respiration Rates on Mercury Methylation and Demethylation in Lake Water},
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 year = {1992},
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 abstract = {Effects of changes in DOC concentrations, pH, and microbial respiration rates on specific rates of mercury methylation and demethylation in lake water were studied using radioisotopic techniques. Increased concentrations of DOC resulted in decreased specific rates of net methylation, possibly as a result of complexation of inorganic mercury with DOC. A reduction in pH from 7.0 to 5.0 had the greatest effect, causing large to moderate increases in net methylation rate at both low and high DOC concentrations (500–2600 μM). Rates of respiration (indicative of general rates of microbial activity), which were insensitive to pH change over the range tested (5.0–7.0), had the smallest effect on net methyl mercury production rates. We propose the following explanations for three situations in which high mercury concentrations are commonly found in fish. (1) in acidified dilute clear-water lakes, high fish mercury concentrations may be a result of enhanced in-lake methylation; (2) in brown-water circumneutral lakes, where in-lake methylation is inhibited by high DOC concentrations, terrestrial inputs of methyl mercury may be most important; and (3) in brown-water, low-pH lakes, both in-lake and terrestrial sources of methyl mercury may contribute to elevated mercury concentrations in fish.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Brenda, M. and Rudd, J. W. M. and Kelly, C. A.},
 journal = {Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences},
 number = {1},
 keywords = {BACTERIA,BIOAVAILABILITY,CONTAMINANTS,CULTURE,DOC,ELA,HG,L658,MEHG,METAALICUS,METALS,METHODS,METHYLATION,MODEL,SULFIDE,mercury}
}
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