Constructive journalism: Proponents, precedents, and principles. Bro, P. Journalism, 20(4):504–519, April, 2019.
Constructive journalism: Proponents, precedents, and principles [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Constructive journalism has become a popular term in recent years, and has been the basis of a number of seminars, conferences, courses at journalism schools, fellowship programs, and research projects. This article traces the origins of constructive journalism by describing and discussing the proponents, precedents, and principles of the movement. The article shows that constructive journalism is no new term and that its inherent principles share similarities with other well-known movements in the history of journalism. These include action journalism that was popular on both sides of the Atlantic at the turn of last century and public journalism that flourished at the turn of this century. Common for most of these movement are, however, their lack of conceptual clarity. The differences and similarities between constructive journalism, past movements, and more classical conceptions of journalism are analyzed through the framework of the Journalistic Compass that delineates four classical roles within journalism. The article concludes by describing the opportunities–and difficulties – that this recent movement faces as still more persons and organizations lay claim to practicing constructive journalism and it discusses how the proponents might learn from former movements that have gained popularity for a period but whose importance has since diminished.
@article{bro_constructive_2019,
	title = {Constructive journalism: {Proponents}, precedents, and principles},
	volume = {20},
	issn = {1464-8849, 1741-3001},
	shorttitle = {Constructive journalism},
	url = {http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1464884918770523},
	doi = {10.1177/1464884918770523},
	abstract = {Constructive journalism has become a popular term in recent years, and has been the basis of a number of seminars, conferences, courses at journalism schools, fellowship programs, and research projects. This article traces the origins of constructive journalism by describing and discussing the proponents, precedents, and principles of the movement. The article shows that constructive journalism is no new term and that its inherent principles share similarities with other well-known movements in the history of journalism. These include action journalism that was popular on both sides of the Atlantic at the turn of last century and public journalism that flourished at the turn of this century. Common for most of these movement are, however, their lack of conceptual clarity. The differences and similarities between constructive journalism, past movements, and more classical conceptions of journalism are analyzed through the framework of the Journalistic Compass that delineates four classical roles within journalism. The article concludes by describing the opportunities–and difficulties – that this recent movement faces as still more persons and organizations lay claim to practicing constructive journalism and it discusses how the proponents might learn from former movements that have gained popularity for a period but whose importance has since diminished.},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	urldate = {2022-11-30},
	journal = {Journalism},
	author = {Bro, Peter},
	month = apr,
	year = {2019},
	keywords = {*[Special issue] Constructive Journalism},
	pages = {504--519},
}

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