The Speech-Language Pathologists' Role in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury for Middle and High School-Age Children: Viewpoints on Guidelines From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Brown, J., O'Brien, K., Knollman-Porter, K., & Wallace, T. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 28(3):1363–1370, 2019. Number: 3
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Purpose The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released guidelines for rehabilitation professionals regarding the care of children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Given that mTBI impacts millions of children each year and can be particularly detrimental to children in middle and high school age groups, access to universal recommendations for management of postinjury symptoms is ideal. Method This viewpoint article examines the CDC guidelines and applies these recommendations directly to speech-language pathology practices. In particular, education, assessment, treatment, team management, and ongoing monitoring are discussed. In addition, suggested timelines regarding implementation of services by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are provided. Specific focus is placed on adolescents (i.e., middle and high school-age children). Results SLPs are critical members of the rehabilitation team working with children with mTBI and should be involved in education, symptom monitoring, and assessment early in the recovery process. SLPs can also provide unique insight into the cognitive and linguistic challenges of these students and can serve to bridge the gap among rehabilitation and school-based professionals, the adolescent with brain injury, and their parents. Conclusion The guidelines provided by the CDC, along with evidence from the field of speech pathology, can guide SLPs to advocate for involvement in the care of adolescents with mTBI. More research is needed to enhance the evidence base for direct assessment and treatment with this population; however, SLPs can use their extensive knowledge and experience working with individuals with traumatic brain injury as a starting point for post-mTBI care.
@article{brown_speech-language_2019,
	title = {The {Speech}-{Language} {Pathologists}' {Role} in {Mild} {Traumatic} {Brain} {Injury} for {Middle} and {High} {School}-{Age} {Children}: {Viewpoints} on {Guidelines} {From} the {Centers} for {Disease} {Control} and {Prevention}},
	volume = {28},
	issn = {1558-9110},
	shorttitle = {The {Speech}-{Language} {Pathologists}' {Role} in {Mild} {Traumatic} {Brain} {Injury} for {Middle} and {High} {School}-{Age} {Children}},
	doi = {10.1044/2019_AJSLP-18-0296},
	abstract = {Purpose The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released guidelines for rehabilitation professionals regarding the care of children with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Given that mTBI impacts millions of children each year and can be particularly detrimental to children in middle and high school age groups, access to universal recommendations for management of postinjury symptoms is ideal. Method This viewpoint article examines the CDC guidelines and applies these recommendations directly to speech-language pathology practices. In particular, education, assessment, treatment, team management, and ongoing monitoring are discussed. In addition, suggested timelines regarding implementation of services by speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are provided. Specific focus is placed on adolescents (i.e., middle and high school-age children). Results SLPs are critical members of the rehabilitation team working with children with mTBI and should be involved in education, symptom monitoring, and assessment early in the recovery process. SLPs can also provide unique insight into the cognitive and linguistic challenges of these students and can serve to bridge the gap among rehabilitation and school-based professionals, the adolescent with brain injury, and their parents. Conclusion The guidelines provided by the CDC, along with evidence from the field of speech pathology, can guide SLPs to advocate for involvement in the care of adolescents with mTBI. More research is needed to enhance the evidence base for direct assessment and treatment with this population; however, SLPs can use their extensive knowledge and experience working with individuals with traumatic brain injury as a starting point for post-mTBI care.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {3},
	journal = {American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology},
	author = {Brown, Jessica and O'Brien, Katy and Knollman-Porter, Kelly and Wallace, Tracey},
	year = {2019},
	pmid = {31170352},
	note = {Number: 3},
	pages = {1363--1370},
}

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