The major trimeric antenna complexes serve as a site for qH-energy dissipation in plants. Bru, P., Steen, C. J., Park, S., Amstutz, C. L., Sylak-Glassman, E. J., Lam, L., Fekete, A., Mueller, M. J., Longoni, F., Fleming, G. R., Niyogi, K. K., & Malnoë, A. Journal of Biological Chemistry, September, 2022.
The major trimeric antenna complexes serve as a site for qH-energy dissipation in plants [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Plants and algae are faced with a conundrum: harvesting sufficient light to drive their metabolic needs while dissipating light in excess to prevent photodamage, a process known as non-photochemical quenching. A slowly relaxing form of energy dissipation, termed qH, is critical for plants’ survival under abiotic stress; however, qH location in the photosynthetic membrane is unresolved. Here, we tested whether we could isolate subcomplexes from plants in which qH was induced that would remain in an energy-dissipative state. Interestingly, we found chlorophyll fluorescence lifetimes were decreased by qH in isolated major trimeric antenna complexes, indicating that they serve as a site for qH-energy dissipation and providing a natively quenched complex with physiological relevance to natural conditions. Next, we monitored the changes in thylakoid pigment, protein, and lipid content of antenna with active or inactive qH, but did not detect any evident differences. Finally, we investigated whether specific subunits of the major antenna complexes were required for qH, but found that qH was insensitive to trimer composition. Because we previously observed that qH can occur in the absence of specific xanthophylls, and no evident changes in pigments, proteins, or lipids were detected, we tentatively propose that the energy-dissipative state reported here may stem from chlorophyll-chlorophyll excitonic interaction.
@article{bru_major_2022,
	title = {The major trimeric antenna complexes serve as a site for {qH}-energy dissipation in plants},
	issn = {0021-9258},
	url = {https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021925822009620},
	doi = {10.1016/j.jbc.2022.102519},
	abstract = {Plants and algae are faced with a conundrum: harvesting sufficient light to drive their metabolic needs while dissipating light in excess to prevent photodamage, a process known as non-photochemical quenching. A slowly relaxing form of energy dissipation, termed qH, is critical for plants’ survival under abiotic stress; however, qH location in the photosynthetic membrane is unresolved. Here, we tested whether we could isolate subcomplexes from plants in which qH was induced that would remain in an energy-dissipative state. Interestingly, we found chlorophyll fluorescence lifetimes were decreased by qH in isolated major trimeric antenna complexes, indicating that they serve as a site for qH-energy dissipation and providing a natively quenched complex with physiological relevance to natural conditions. Next, we monitored the changes in thylakoid pigment, protein, and lipid content of antenna with active or inactive qH, but did not detect any evident differences. Finally, we investigated whether specific subunits of the major antenna complexes were required for qH, but found that qH was insensitive to trimer composition. Because we previously observed that qH can occur in the absence of specific xanthophylls, and no evident changes in pigments, proteins, or lipids were detected, we tentatively propose that the energy-dissipative state reported here may stem from chlorophyll-chlorophyll excitonic interaction.},
	language = {en},
	urldate = {2022-09-30},
	journal = {Journal of Biological Chemistry},
	author = {Bru, Pierrick and Steen, Collin J. and Park, Soomin and Amstutz, Cynthia L. and Sylak-Glassman, Emily J. and Lam, Lam and Fekete, Agnes and Mueller, Martin J. and Longoni, Fiamma and Fleming, Graham R. and Niyogi, Krishna K. and Malnoë, Alizée},
	month = sep,
	year = {2022},
	keywords = {CRISPR/Cas9, abiotic stress, energy dissipation, light-harvesting complexes, non-photochemical quenching qH, photosynthesis, time-resolved fluorescence},
	pages = {102519},
}

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