Measuring and modeling polymer gradients argues that spindle microtubules regulate their own nucleation. Bryan Kayea,b, Olivia Stiehla,b, Peter J. Fostera,b, Michael J. Shelleyd,e, Daniel J. Needlemana,b,c, S. and Fürthauerd
Measuring	and	modeling	polymer	gradients	argues	that	 spindle	microtubules	regulate	their	own	nucleation [pdf]Paper  Measuring	and	modeling	polymer	gradients	argues	that	 spindle	microtubules	regulate	their	own	nucleation [pdf]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Spindles are self-organized microtubule-based structures that segregate chromosomes during cell division. The mass of the spindle is controlled by the balance between microtubule turnover and nucleation. The mechanisms that control the spatial regulation of microtubule nucleation remain poorly understood. Previous work has found that microtubule nucleators bind to microtubules in the spindle, but it is unclear if this binding regulates the activity of those nucleators. Here we use a combination of experiments and mathematical modeling to investigate this issue. We measure the concentration of tubulin and microtubules in and around the spindle. We found a very sharp decay in microtubules at the spindle interface, which is inconsistent with the activity of microtubule nucleators being independent of their association with microtubules and consistent with a model in which microtubule nucleators are only active when bound to a microtubule. This strongly argues that the activity of microtubule nucleators is greatly enhanced when bound to microtubules. Thus, microtubule nucleators are both localized and activated by the microtubules they generate.
@article{
 title = {Measuring	and	modeling	polymer	gradients	argues	that	 spindle	microtubules	regulate	their	own	nucleation},
 type = {article},
 websites = {https://arxiv.org/pdf/1710.08405.pdf},
 id = {76d30ed9-17a7-36f3-a6c5-5e9f3b49f427},
 created = {2018-04-05T19:19:09.784Z},
 accessed = {2018-04-05},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {3187ec9d-0fcc-3ba2-91e0-3075df9b18c3},
 group_id = {d75e47fd-ff52-3a4b-bf1e-6ebc7e454352},
 last_modified = {2018-04-23T16:00:19.091Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {false},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {BryanKayeabOliviaStiehlabPeterJ.FosterabMichaelJ.ShelleydeDanielJ.Needlemanabc},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Spindles	are	self-organized	microtubule-based	structures	that	segregate	chromosomes	
during	cell	division. The	mass	of	the	spindle	is controlled	by	the	balance	between	
microtubule	turnover	and	nucleation. The	mechanisms	that	control	the	spatial	regulation	
of	microtubule	nucleation remain	poorly	understood.	Previous	work	has	found	that	
microtubule	nucleators	bind	to	microtubules	in	the	spindle,	but	it	is	unclear	if	this	binding	
regulates	the	activity of	those	nucleators.	Here	we	use	a	combination	of	experiments	and	
mathematical	modeling	to	investigate	this	issue.	We	measure	the	concentration	of	tubulin	
and	microtubules	in	and	around	the	spindle.	We	found	a	very	sharp	decay	in	microtubules	
at	the	spindle	interface,	which	is	inconsistent	with	the	activity	of	microtubule	nucleators	
being	independent	of	their	association	with	microtubules and	consistent	with	a	model	in	
which	microtubule	nucleators	are	only	active	when	bound	to	a	microtubule.	This	strongly	
argues	that	the	activity	of	microtubule	nucleators	is	greatly enhanced	when	bound	to	
microtubules.	Thus, microtubule	nucleators	are	both	localized	and	activated	by	the	
microtubules	they	generate.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Bryan	Kayea,b,	Olivia	Stiehla,b,	Peter	J.	Fostera,b,	Michael	J.	Shelleyd,e,	Daniel	J.	Needlemana,b,c, Sebastian and Fürthauerd, undefined}
}
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