Climate Change Impacts on Tree Species, Forest Properties, and Ecosystem Services. Bugmann, H.; Brang, P.; Elkin, C.; Henne, P.; Jakoby, O.; Lévesque, M.; Lischke, H.; Psomas, A.; Rigling, A.; Wermelinger, B.; and Zimmermann, N. E. In Appenzeller, C.; Fischer, E. M.; Fuhrer, J.; Grosjean, M.; Hohmann, R.; Joos, F.; Raible, C. C.; Ritz, C.; Raible, C. C.; and Strassmann, K. M., editors, Toward Quantitative Scenarios of Climate Change Impacts in Switzerland, pages 79–88. OCCR, FOEN, MeteoSwiss, C2SM, Agroscope and ProClim.
Climate Change Impacts on Tree Species, Forest Properties, and Ecosystem Services [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[::] Swiss forests experience strong impacts under the CH2011 scenarios, partly even for the low greenhouse gas scenario RCP3PD. Negative impacts prevail in low-elevation forests, whereas mostly positive impacts are expected in high-elevation forests. [::] Major changes in the distribution of the two most important tree species, Norway spruce and European beech, are expected. Growth conditions for spruce improve in a broad range of scenarios at presently cool high-elevation sites with plentiful preci- pitation, but in the case of strong warming (A1B and A2) spruce and beech are at risk in large parts of the swiss plateau. [::] High elevation forests that are temperature-limited will show little change in species composition but an increase in biomass. In contrast, forests at low elevations in warm-dry inner-alpine valleys are sensitive to even moderate warming and may no longer sustain current biomass and species. [::] Timber production potential, carbon storage, and protection from avalanches and rockfall react differently to climate change, with an overall tendency to deteriorate at low elevations, and improve at high elevations. [::] Climate change will affect forests also indirectly, e.g., by increasing the risk of infestation by spruce bark beetles, which will profit from an extended flight period and will produce more generations per year.
@incollection{bugmannClimateChangeImpacts2014,
  title = {Climate Change Impacts on Tree Species, Forest Properties, and Ecosystem Services},
  booktitle = {Toward {{Quantitative Scenarios}} of {{Climate Change Impacts}} in {{Switzerland}}},
  author = {Bugmann, H. and Brang, P. and Elkin, C. and Henne, P. and Jakoby, O. and Lévesque, M. and Lischke, H. and Psomas, A. and Rigling, A. and Wermelinger, B. and Zimmermann, N. E.},
  editor = {Appenzeller, C. and Fischer, E. M. and Fuhrer, J. and Grosjean, M. and Hohmann, R. and Joos, F. and Raible, C. C. and Ritz, C. and Raible, C. C. and Strassmann, K. M.},
  date = {2014},
  pages = {79--88},
  publisher = {{OCCR, FOEN, MeteoSwiss, C2SM, Agroscope and ProClim}},
  location = {{Bern, Switzerland}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13590963},
  abstract = {[::] Swiss forests experience strong impacts under the CH2011 scenarios, partly even for the low greenhouse gas scenario RCP3PD. Negative impacts prevail in low-elevation forests, whereas mostly positive impacts are expected in high-elevation forests. 

[::] Major changes in the distribution of the two most important tree species, Norway spruce and European beech, are expected. Growth conditions for spruce improve in a broad range of scenarios at presently cool high-elevation sites with plentiful preci- pitation, but in the case of strong warming (A1B and A2) spruce and beech are at risk in large parts of the swiss plateau. 

[::] High elevation forests that are temperature-limited will show little change in species composition but an increase in biomass. In contrast, forests at low elevations in warm-dry inner-alpine valleys are sensitive to even moderate warming and may no longer sustain current biomass and species. 

[::] Timber production potential, carbon storage, and protection from avalanches and rockfall react differently to climate change, with an overall tendency to deteriorate at low elevations, and improve at high elevations. 

[::] Climate change will affect forests also indirectly, e.g., by increasing the risk of infestation by spruce bark beetles, which will profit from an extended flight period and will produce more generations per year.},
  isbn = {978-3-033-04406-7},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13590963,biodiversity-impacts,climate-change,forest-resources,switzerland}
}
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