Mapping Ecosystem Service Supply, Demand and Budgets. Burkhard, B.; Kroll, F.; Nedkov, S.; and Müller, F. 21:17–29.
Mapping Ecosystem Service Supply, Demand and Budgets [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Abstract] Among the main effects of human activities on the environment are land use and resulting land cover changes. Such changes impact the capacity of ecosystems to provide goods and services to the human society. This supply of multiple goods and services by nature should match the demands of the society, if self-sustaining human-environmental systems and a sustainable utilization of natural capital are to be achieved. To describe respective states and dynamics, appropriate indicators and data for their quantification, including quantitative and qualitative assessments, are needed. By linking land cover information from, e.g. remote sensing, land survey and GIS with data from monitoring, statistics, modeling or interviews, ecosystem service supply and demand can be assessed and transferred to different spatial and temporal scales. The results reveal patterns of human activities over time and space as well as the capacities of different ecosystems to provide ecosystem services under changing land use. Also the locations of respective demands for these services can be determined. As maps are powerful tools, they hold high potentials for visualization of complex phenomena. We present an easy-to-apply concept based on a matrix linking spatially explicit biophysical landscape units to ecological integrity, ecosystem service supply and demand. An exemplary application for energy supply and demand in a central German case study region and respective maps for the years 1990 and 2007 are presented. Based on these data, the concept for an appropriate quantification and related spatial visualization of ecosystem service supply and demand is elaborated and discussed. [Highlights] [::] Matrices linking land cover, ecosystem integrity, service supply, demand and budgets. [::] Maps of ecosystem service supply, demand and budgets for a German case study. [::] Urban areas are an ecosystem service sink, rural regions show oversupply. [::] Further development of ecosystem service mapping is needed for environmental management.
@article{burkhardMappingEcosystemService2012,
  title = {Mapping Ecosystem Service Supply, Demand and Budgets},
  author = {Burkhard, Benjamin and Kroll, Franziska and Nedkov, Stoyan and Müller, Felix},
  date = {2012-10},
  journaltitle = {Ecological Indicators},
  volume = {21},
  pages = {17--29},
  issn = {1470-160X},
  doi = {10.1016/j.ecolind.2011.06.019},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolind.2011.06.019},
  abstract = {[Abstract] 

Among the main effects of human activities on the environment are land use and resulting land cover changes. Such changes impact the capacity of ecosystems to provide goods and services to the human society. This supply of multiple goods and services by nature should match the demands of the society, if self-sustaining human-environmental systems and a sustainable utilization of natural capital are to be achieved. To describe respective states and dynamics, appropriate indicators and data for their quantification, including quantitative and qualitative assessments, are needed. By linking land cover information from, e.g. remote sensing, land survey and GIS with data from monitoring, statistics, modeling or interviews, ecosystem service supply and demand can be assessed and transferred to different spatial and temporal scales. The results reveal patterns of human activities over time and space as well as the capacities of different ecosystems to provide ecosystem services under changing land use. Also the locations of respective demands for these services can be determined. As maps are powerful tools, they hold high potentials for visualization of complex phenomena. We present an easy-to-apply concept based on a matrix linking spatially explicit biophysical landscape units to ecological integrity, ecosystem service supply and demand. An exemplary application for energy supply and demand in a central German case study region and respective maps for the years 1990 and 2007 are presented. Based on these data, the concept for an appropriate quantification and related spatial visualization of ecosystem service supply and demand is elaborated and discussed.

[Highlights]

[::] Matrices linking land cover, ecosystem integrity, service supply, demand and budgets. [::] Maps of ecosystem service supply, demand and budgets for a German case study. [::] Urban areas are an ecosystem service sink, rural regions show oversupply. [::] Further development of ecosystem service mapping is needed for environmental management.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-9827654,controversial-monetarisation,ecosystem,ecosystem-services,indicators,indices,multi-criteria-decision-analysis,multiplicity}
}
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