Anton Raederscheidt's distorted self-portraits and their significance for understanding balance in art. Butter, C. J Hist Neurosci, 13(1):66–78, 2004.
Anton Raederscheidt's distorted self-portraits and their significance for understanding balance in art [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Following a right cerebral stroke, the German artist Anton Raederscheidt produced a remarkable series of self-portraits that depicted his severe visual neglect and gradual recovery. These distorted images, like those drawn by others with this disorder, inform us about lateral balance in art and why it is common in the art of cultures separated in time and space. After describing how artists in various cultures have employed lateral balance, I present Arnheim's view that this aspect of art is the result of visual forces generated by the brain. Following a brief history of visual neglect, I present evidence that this disorder provides us with clues to the origin of the visual forces responsible for lateral balance in art. The relevant brain mechanisms control exploration of visual space by integrating orienting movements with visual spatial information. The prevalence of lateral balance in art becomes understandable when we consider that these brain mechanisms evolved to promote survival in our vertebrate ancestors. I end with a speculative neurological account of the aesthetics of lateral balance–why it is pleasing and its absence is displeasing.
@article{butter_anton_2004,
	title = {Anton {Raederscheidt}'s distorted self-portraits and their significance for understanding balance in art},
	volume = {13},
	url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15370338},
	doi = {10.1080/09647040490885501},
	abstract = {Following a right cerebral stroke, the German artist Anton Raederscheidt produced a remarkable series of self-portraits that depicted his severe visual neglect and gradual recovery. These distorted images, like those drawn by others with this disorder, inform us about lateral balance in art and why it is common in the art of cultures separated in time and space. After describing how artists in various cultures have employed lateral balance, I present Arnheim's view that this aspect of art is the result of visual forces generated by the brain. Following a brief history of visual neglect, I present evidence that this disorder provides us with clues to the origin of the visual forces responsible for lateral balance in art. The relevant brain mechanisms control exploration of visual space by integrating orienting movements with visual spatial information. The prevalence of lateral balance in art becomes understandable when we consider that these brain mechanisms evolved to promote survival in our vertebrate ancestors. I end with a speculative neurological account of the aesthetics of lateral balance--why it is pleasing and its absence is displeasing.},
	number = {1},
	journal = {J Hist Neurosci},
	author = {Butter, C.M.},
	year = {2004},
	keywords = {\#nosource, *Famous Persons, *Medicine in Art, Germany, History, 20th Century, Humans, Perceptual Distortion, Portraits as Topic/*history, Space Perception, Stroke/*history, Visual Perception},
	pages = {66--78},
}

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