Massage therapy for cancer pain. Calenda, E. Current Pain and Headache Reports, 10(4):270--274, August, 2006.
abstract   bibtex   
Therapeutic massage as a cancer pain intervention appears to be safe and effective. Patients who receive massage have less procedural pain, nausea, and anxiety and report improved quality of life. The use of massage in cancer care centers and hospitals is on the rise. Massage has a positive effect on biochemistry, increasing levels of dopamine, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Specialized training of massage therapists in caring for people with cancer is recommended. Most studies to date are small but promising. Exact methodology and best practices warrant further investigation by the industry. More randomized clinical trials and case studies must be conducted.
@article{ calenda_massage_2006,
  title = {Massage therapy for cancer pain},
  volume = {10},
  issn = {1531-3433},
  abstract = {Therapeutic massage as a cancer pain intervention appears to be safe and effective. Patients who receive massage have less procedural pain, nausea, and anxiety and report improved quality of life. The use of massage in cancer care centers and hospitals is on the rise. Massage has a positive effect on biochemistry, increasing levels of dopamine, lymphocytes, and natural killer cells. Specialized training of massage therapists in caring for people with cancer is recommended. Most studies to date are small but promising. Exact methodology and best practices warrant further investigation by the industry. More randomized clinical trials and case studies must be conducted.},
  language = {eng},
  number = {4},
  journal = {Current Pain and Headache Reports},
  author = {Calenda, Elaine},
  month = {August},
  year = {2006},
  pmid = {16834941},
  keywords = {Humans, Massage, Neoplasms, Pain, Pain Management, cancer},
  pages = {270--274}
}
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