Mercury biomagnification in the food web of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania, East Africa). Campbell, L.; Verburg, P.; Dixon, D., G.; and Hecky, R., E. The Science of the total environment, 402(2-3):184-91, 9, 2008.
Mercury biomagnification in the food web of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania, East Africa). [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Lake Tanganyika is a globally important lake with high endemic biodiversity. Millions of people in the lake basin depend on several fish species for consumption. Due to the importance of fish consumption as an exposure route of mercury to humans, we sampled Lake Tanganyika in 2000 to assess total mercury concentrations and biomagnification of total mercury through the food web. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses of food web structure indicate a complex food web with overlapping omnivory with some specialist fish species. Stable nitrogen isotope analyses further confirm that mercury is biomagnifying through the Tanganyika food web at rates similar to those seen in Lakes Malawi and Victoria, the other two African Great Lakes. Most collected fish species and all invertebrate species had mercury concentrations below 0.2 microg Hg/g wet weight. However, several fish species, Ctenochromis horei (average 0.15 microg/g ww), Neolamprologus boulengeri (0.2 microg/g ww) , Bathybates spp.spp. (0.21 microg/g ww), Mastacembelus cunningtoni (0.22 microg/g ww) and Clarias theodorae (0.22 microg/g ww) approached or slightly exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO)'s recommended guideline of 0.2 microg Hg/g for vulnerable populations with high rates of fish consumption. Two individuals of the piscivorous fish species Lates microlepis (0.54, 0.78 microg/g ww) and a Polypterus congicus (1.3 microg/g ww) exceeded the international marketing limit value of 0.5 microg/g ww. Because C. theodorae and L. microlepis are also important market fish species, there is a need to monitor mercury concentrations in internationally marketed fish from Lake Tanganikya to ensure that those fish do not present a risk to human consumers.
@article{
 title = {Mercury biomagnification in the food web of Lake Tanganyika (Tanzania, East Africa).},
 type = {article},
 year = {2008},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {A0008,AF_FS_008,AF_SF_002,GBMS},
 pages = {184-91},
 volume = {402},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18559282},
 month = {9},
 day = {1},
 id = {3a9cdcfb-11ad-3d0b-b6a7-29ec8d871fe1},
 created = {2011-11-01T16:41:28.000Z},
 accessed = {2010-10-28},
 file_attached = {true},
 profile_id = {47679fbe-3c42-3026-a5ee-774421e2a38b},
 group_id = {3addd0f7-d578-34d3-be80-24022cc062a1},
 last_modified = {2017-03-14T12:29:49.371Z},
 read = {true},
 starred = {true},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 citation_key = {Campbell2008},
 folder_uuids = {a3ecfd26-34c0-4c1a-a95d-a0ed815f154e},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {Lake Tanganyika is a globally important lake with high endemic biodiversity. Millions of people in the lake basin depend on several fish species for consumption. Due to the importance of fish consumption as an exposure route of mercury to humans, we sampled Lake Tanganyika in 2000 to assess total mercury concentrations and biomagnification of total mercury through the food web. Stable nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses of food web structure indicate a complex food web with overlapping omnivory with some specialist fish species. Stable nitrogen isotope analyses further confirm that mercury is biomagnifying through the Tanganyika food web at rates similar to those seen in Lakes Malawi and Victoria, the other two African Great Lakes. Most collected fish species and all invertebrate species had mercury concentrations below 0.2 microg Hg/g wet weight. However, several fish species, Ctenochromis horei (average 0.15 microg/g ww), Neolamprologus boulengeri (0.2 microg/g ww) , Bathybates spp.spp. (0.21 microg/g ww), Mastacembelus cunningtoni (0.22 microg/g ww) and Clarias theodorae (0.22 microg/g ww) approached or slightly exceeded the World Health Organization (WHO)'s recommended guideline of 0.2 microg Hg/g for vulnerable populations with high rates of fish consumption. Two individuals of the piscivorous fish species Lates microlepis (0.54, 0.78 microg/g ww) and a Polypterus congicus (1.3 microg/g ww) exceeded the international marketing limit value of 0.5 microg/g ww. Because C. theodorae and L. microlepis are also important market fish species, there is a need to monitor mercury concentrations in internationally marketed fish from Lake Tanganikya to ensure that those fish do not present a risk to human consumers.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Campbell, L and Verburg, Piet and Dixon, D G and Hecky, R E},
 journal = {The Science of the total environment},
 number = {2-3}
}
Downloads: 0