Opportunities and Risks for Citizen Science in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Ceccaroni, L.; Bibby, J.; Roger, E.; Flemons, P.; Michael, K.; Fagan, L.; and Oliver, J. L. Citizen Science: Theory and Practice, 4(1):29, November, 2019. ZSCC: 0000003 Number: 1 Publisher: Ubiquity Press
Opportunities and Risks for Citizen Science in the Age of Artificial Intelligence [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Members of the public are making substantial contributions to science as citizen scientists, and advances in technologies have enabled citizens to make even more substantial contributions. Technologies that allow computers and machines to function in an intelligent manner, often referred to as artificial intelligence (AI), are now being applied in citizen science. Discussions about guidelines, responsibilities, and ethics of AI usage are already happening outside the field of citizen science. We suggest such considerations should also be explored carefully in the context of citizen science applications. To start the conversation, we offer the citizen science community an essay to introduce the state-of-play for AI in citizen science and its potential uses in the future. We begin by presenting a systematic overview of AI technologies currently being applied, highlighting exemplary projects for each technology type described. We then discuss how AI is likely to be increasingly utilised in citizen science into the future, and, through scenarios, we explore both future opportunities and potential risks. Lastly, we conclude by providing recommendations that warrant consideration by the citizen science community, such as developing a data stewardship plan to inform citizens in advance of plans and expected outcomes of using data for AI training, or adopting good practice around anonymity. Our intent is for this essay to lead to further critical discussions among citizen science practitioners, which is needed for responsible, ethical, and useful use of AI in citizen science.
@article{ceccaroni_opportunities_2019,
	title = {Opportunities and {Risks} for {Citizen} {Science} in the {Age} of {Artificial} {Intelligence}},
	volume = {4},
	copyright = {Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:    Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a  Creative Commons Attribution License  that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.  Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.  Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work (See  The Effect of Open Access ).  All third-party images reproduced on this journal are shared under Educational Fair Use. For more information on  Educational Fair Use , please see  this useful checklist prepared by Columbia University Libraries .   All copyright  of third-party content posted here for research purposes belongs to its original owners.  Unless otherwise stated all references to characters and comic art presented on this journal are ©, ® or ™ of their respective owners. No challenge to any owner’s rights is intended or should be inferred.},
	issn = {2057-4991},
	url = {http://theoryandpractice.citizenscienceassociation.org/articles/10.5334/cstp.241/},
	doi = {10.5334/cstp.241},
	abstract = {Members of the public are making substantial contributions to science as citizen scientists, and advances in technologies have enabled citizens to make even more substantial contributions. Technologies that allow computers and machines to function in an intelligent manner, often referred to as artificial intelligence (AI), are now being applied in citizen science. Discussions about guidelines, responsibilities, and ethics of AI usage are already happening outside the field of citizen science. We suggest such considerations should also be explored carefully in the context of citizen science applications. To start the conversation, we offer the citizen science community an essay to introduce the state-of-play for AI in citizen science and its potential uses in the future. We begin by presenting a systematic overview of AI technologies currently being applied, highlighting exemplary projects for each technology type described. We then discuss how AI is likely to be increasingly utilised in citizen science into the future, and, through scenarios, we explore both future opportunities and potential risks. Lastly, we conclude by providing recommendations that warrant consideration by the citizen science community, such as developing a data stewardship plan to inform citizens in advance of plans and expected outcomes of using data for AI training, or adopting good practice around anonymity. Our intent is for this essay to lead to further critical discussions among citizen science practitioners, which is needed for responsible, ethical, and useful use of AI in citizen science.},
	language = {en},
	number = {1},
	urldate = {2020-06-05},
	journal = {Citizen Science: Theory and Practice},
	author = {Ceccaroni, Luigi and Bibby, James and Roger, Erin and Flemons, Paul and Michael, Katina and Fagan, Laura and Oliver, Jessica L.},
	month = nov,
	year = {2019},
	note = {ZSCC: 0000003 
Number: 1
Publisher: Ubiquity Press},
	pages = {29},
}
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