Nurses' perception of single-occupancy versus multioccupancy rooms in acute care environments: An exploratory comparative assessment. Chaudhury, H., Mahmood, A., & Valente, M. Applied Nursing Research, 19(3):118--125, 2006.
Nurses' perception of single-occupancy versus multioccupancy rooms in acute care environments: An exploratory comparative assessment [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Health care design professionals, planners, and administrators cite the advantages of private patient rooms, including reduction of hospital-acquired infections, reduction of patient stress levels, and facilitation of nurses' and health care workers' efficiency [e.g., Ulrich, R. (2003). Creating a healing environment with evidence-based design. Paper presented at the American Institute of Architects, Academy of Architecture for Health virtual seminar-Healing environments; Ulrich, R., Quan, X., Zimring, C., Joseph, A., & Choudhary, R. (2004). The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime-opportunity. http://www.healthdesign.org/research/reports/physical_environ.php]. A review of the literature revealed that operating costs are reduced in single-patient rooms compared with multioccupancy rooms due to reduction in transfer cost, higher bed occupancy rates, and reduction in labor cost. In addition, single rooms can positively impact patients' hospital experience through increased privacy, better interaction between family and staff, and reduced noise and anxiety. This pilot study focused on nurses' perception of the advantages and disadvantages of single-occupancy versus multioccupancy patient rooms in medical-surgical units in four hospitals in the northwest. A majority of respondents in the four hospitals favored single rooms over double-occupancy rooms for the majority of the 15 categories, including the following: appropriateness for patient examination, interaction with or accommodation of family members, and lower probability of dietary mix-ups. Future studies need to carefully examine the objective measures of patient care variables (e.g., incidents of medication errors, opportunities for surveillance), patient outcomes (e.g., recovery rate, falls), and implications of room occupancy on operating costs. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
@article{chaudhury_nurses_2006,
	title = {Nurses' perception of single-occupancy versus multioccupancy rooms in acute care environments: {An} exploratory comparative assessment},
	volume = {19},
	url = {http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-33746292919&partnerID=40&md5=6883ed9b30e2537b1fddf521e632f401},
	abstract = {Health care design professionals, planners, and administrators cite the advantages of private patient rooms, including reduction of hospital-acquired infections, reduction of patient stress levels, and facilitation of nurses' and health care workers' efficiency [e.g., Ulrich, R. (2003). Creating a healing environment with evidence-based design. Paper presented at the American Institute of Architects, Academy of Architecture for Health virtual seminar-Healing environments; Ulrich, R., Quan, X., Zimring, C., Joseph, A., \& Choudhary, R. (2004). The role of the physical environment in the hospital of the 21st century: A once-in-a-lifetime-opportunity. http://www.healthdesign.org/research/reports/physical\_environ.php]. A review of the literature revealed that operating costs are reduced in single-patient rooms compared with multioccupancy rooms due to reduction in transfer cost, higher bed occupancy rates, and reduction in labor cost. In addition, single rooms can positively impact patients' hospital experience through increased privacy, better interaction between family and staff, and reduced noise and anxiety. This pilot study focused on nurses' perception of the advantages and disadvantages of single-occupancy versus multioccupancy patient rooms in medical-surgical units in four hospitals in the northwest. A majority of respondents in the four hospitals favored single rooms over double-occupancy rooms for the majority of the 15 categories, including the following: appropriateness for patient examination, interaction with or accommodation of family members, and lower probability of dietary mix-ups. Future studies need to carefully examine the objective measures of patient care variables (e.g., incidents of medication errors, opportunities for surveillance), patient outcomes (e.g., recovery rate, falls), and implications of room occupancy on operating costs. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
	number = {3},
	journal = {Applied Nursing Research},
	author = {Chaudhury, H. and Mahmood, A. and Valente, M.},
	year = {2006},
	keywords = {zuPazi},
	pages = {118--125}
}
Downloads: 0