Synthetic cannabinoid use in an acute psychiatric inpatient unit. Clancy, Vincent, R., Hodgson, Charles, R., Kendurkar, Arvind, Terry, Ann, M., Dadd, Lawrence, Clancy, Maria, D., Ryan, Karen, Hatzistylis, Maria, Tinman, & Graham, B. April, 2018.
Synthetic cannabinoid use in an acute psychiatric inpatient unit. [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
In the present study, we explored the prevalence of new psychoactive substance use by people admitted into an Australian acute public mental health facility specializing in comorbid mental health and substance use. These substances have since been banned from retail outlets, but the pattern of uptake and reasons people use them is informative in terms of motivations and the management of substance use more generally. A cross‐sectional study to explore the use of synthetic cannabis by people admitted to an acute adult mental health unit was undertaken. Associations with diagnostic, service use, and demographic profiles were explored. Fifty‐six percent of people reported having used at least one type of new psychoactive substance, including 53.5% who reported using synthetic cannabis alone, and 18.8% who reported using both synthetic cannabis and other new psychoactive substances. Synthetic cannabis use was not associated with any demographic or diagnostic groups. Legality and availability (43% combined) were common reasons for use, along with the feeling of intoxication (20%). The high prevalence of new psychoactive substance use adds weight to the recommendation that clinicians should routinely screen for substances from the time of admission. Accurate information about these substances is required in order to provide accurate guidance and appropriate interventions to people in their care.
@article{clancy_synthetic_2018,
	title = {Synthetic cannabinoid use in an acute psychiatric inpatient unit.},
	copyright = {2016 EBSCO Information Services},
	url = {http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=128731947&site=ehost-live},
	abstract = {In the present study, we explored the prevalence of new psychoactive substance use by people admitted into an Australian acute public mental health facility specializing in comorbid mental health and substance use. These substances have since been banned from retail outlets, but the pattern of uptake and reasons people use them is informative in terms of motivations and the management of substance use more generally. A cross‐sectional study to explore the use of synthetic cannabis by people admitted to an acute adult mental health unit was undertaken. Associations with diagnostic, service use, and demographic profiles were explored. Fifty‐six percent of people reported having used at least one type of new psychoactive substance, including 53.5\% who reported using synthetic cannabis alone, and 18.8\% who reported using both synthetic cannabis and other new psychoactive substances. Synthetic cannabis use was not associated with any demographic or diagnostic groups. Legality and availability (43\% combined) were common reasons for use, along with the feeling of intoxication (20\%). The high prevalence of new psychoactive substance use adds weight to the recommendation that clinicians should routinely screen for substances from the time of admission. Accurate information about these substances is required in order to provide accurate guidance and appropriate interventions to people in their care.},
	author = {{Clancy} and Vincent, Richard and {Hodgson} and Charles, Robert and {Kendurkar} and {Arvind} and {Terry} and Ann, Margarett and {Dadd} and {Lawrence} and {Clancy} and Maria, Donna and {Ryan} and {Karen} and {Hatzistylis} and {Maria} and {Tinman} and Graham, Benjamin},
	month = apr,
	year = {2018}
}

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