Adolescent perspectives on safety. C.M., S. & L.M., R. 6, 2006.
Adolescent perspectives on safety [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Background: Motor vehicle crashes are the number one cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescents. Emotional and/or neurologic immaturity in teenagers may be a limiting factor to using the necessary judgment to lower the risk of injury in a crash or the risk of crash all together. This same judgment may play a role in adolescent perceptions of risk. This study describes perceived risk of injuries in teenagers, reasons they feel unsafe, risk behaviors and factors influencing safe behaviors. Methods: A 10 question survey was administered by teachers in three senior high schools in Osseo School District, suburban school district in Minnesota. Questions were both quantitative (7) and qualitative (3). The survey was administered to 210 students ages 15-19, in grades 10, 11 and 12. The Department of Health, Injury and Violence Prevention Program provided data on the number of injuries occurring in 2004 within the 4 zip codes served by the 3 schools. Data were analyzed by SPSS 10.0 for Windows and ANOVA. Differences in the mean rank between four zip code areas were analyzed using ANOVA. The Hennepin County Medical Center Institutional Review Board and the principals of the individual schools approved this study. Results: Of the 180 students completing the survey 60.5% were female. The grade distribution was: 10th grade 1.1%), 11th grade (44.1%), and 12th grade (54.7%). The racial/ethnic distribution was 67.2% Caucasian, 17.5% African American and 9.6% Asian/Pacific Islander. The majority of students (67.8%) reported having a driver's permit and 34.3% a driver's license. Respondents identified car crashes (74.3%) as their number one risk for injury followed by falling off a bike (10.7%), being shot (8.3%), being hit by a car on a bike (5.7%), and being burned by a fire (5.3%). When asked open ended questions regarding what made them feel unsafe only 4.4% identified motor vehicle crashes, while 49.4% identified crime and 22.2% identified war or terrorism. The majority (89.3%) reported wearing their seatbelts most of the time. They reported listening to parents (53.9%), friends 30.0%), boyfriends or girlfriends (22.8%), and teachers 15.6%) about wearing a seat belt. Of note, 43.9% reported frequently driving over the speed limit. There were no significant differences in mean rank of perception of injury risk using ANOVA for motor vehicle occupant, burn, falls, or bicycle/motor vehicle injuries. Significant differences were observed in the mean rank for fire arm injuries (p = 0.003). Teenagers in zip codes with the highest number of firearm injuries ranked firearms as a higher risk and reported feeling unsafe due to crime or violence, indicating that exposure to particular injury etiologies may impact teen's perception of risk. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the majority of students were willing to wear a seat belt and would listen to friends and parents on the subject. Adolescents' social relationships can potentially be capitalized upon by injury prevention practitioners. These teenagers correctly identified motor vehicle crashes as the most common cause of injury. Despite this, almost half reported frequently driving over the speed limit, which indicates a disconnect between adolescent knowledge and adolescent decision making while driving. Further study is needed looking into relationships between teen brain development stages, judgment and driving behavior. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
@misc{
 title = {Adolescent perspectives on safety},
 type = {misc},
 year = {2006},
 source = {Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {*adolescent health,*attitude to health,*child safety,*injury,adolescent,conference paper,female,health survey,high school student,human,male,normal human,priority journal,risk assessment,school child},
 pages = {1386-1387},
 volume = {60},
 issue = {6},
 websites = {http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=reference&D=emed7&NEWS=N&AN=2006294513},
 month = {6},
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 abstract = {Background: Motor vehicle crashes are the number one cause of morbidity and mortality among adolescents. Emotional and/or neurologic immaturity in teenagers may be a limiting factor to using the necessary judgment to lower the risk of injury in a crash or the risk of crash all together. This same judgment may play a role in adolescent perceptions of risk. This study describes perceived risk of injuries in teenagers, reasons they feel unsafe, risk behaviors and factors influencing safe behaviors. Methods: A 10 question survey was administered by teachers in three senior high schools in Osseo School District, suburban school district in Minnesota. Questions were both quantitative (7) and qualitative (3). The survey was administered to 210 students ages 15-19, in grades 10, 11 and 12. The Department of Health, Injury and Violence Prevention Program provided data on the number of injuries occurring in 2004 within the 4 zip codes served by the 3 schools. Data were analyzed by SPSS 10.0 for Windows and ANOVA. Differences in the mean rank between four zip code areas were analyzed using ANOVA. The Hennepin County Medical Center Institutional Review Board and the principals of the individual schools approved this study. Results: Of the 180 students completing the survey 60.5% were female. The grade distribution was: 10th grade 1.1%), 11th grade (44.1%), and 12th grade (54.7%). The racial/ethnic distribution was 67.2% Caucasian, 17.5% African American and 9.6% Asian/Pacific Islander. The majority of students (67.8%) reported having a driver's permit and 34.3% a driver's license. Respondents identified car crashes (74.3%) as their number one risk for injury followed by falling off a bike (10.7%), being shot (8.3%), being hit by a car on a bike (5.7%), and being burned by a fire (5.3%). When asked open ended questions regarding what made them feel unsafe only 4.4% identified motor vehicle crashes, while 49.4% identified crime and 22.2% identified war or terrorism. The majority (89.3%) reported wearing their seatbelts most of the time. They reported listening to parents (53.9%), friends 30.0%), boyfriends or girlfriends (22.8%), and teachers 15.6%) about wearing a seat belt. Of note, 43.9% reported frequently driving over the speed limit. There were no significant differences in mean rank of perception of injury risk using ANOVA for motor vehicle occupant, burn, falls, or bicycle/motor vehicle injuries. Significant differences were observed in the mean rank for fire arm injuries (p = 0.003). Teenagers in zip codes with the highest number of firearm injuries ranked firearms as a higher risk and reported feeling unsafe due to crime or violence, indicating that exposure to particular injury etiologies may impact teen's perception of risk. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the majority of students were willing to wear a seat belt and would listen to friends and parents on the subject. Adolescents' social relationships can potentially be capitalized upon by injury prevention practitioners. These teenagers correctly identified motor vehicle crashes as the most common cause of injury. Despite this, almost half reported frequently driving over the speed limit, which indicates a disconnect between adolescent knowledge and adolescent decision making while driving. Further study is needed looking into relationships between teen brain development stages, judgment and driving behavior. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.},
 bibtype = {misc},
 author = {C.M., Schotzko and L.M., Richardson}
}
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