Privacy and Confidentiality in the Nationwide Health Information Network. Cohn, S., P. 6, 2006.
Privacy and Confidentiality in the Nationwide Health Information Network [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
The Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN), on which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is taking the lead, has the potential to enhance health care quality, increase efficiency, and promote public health. The NHIN also creates new challenges to and opportunities for safeguarding health privacy and confidentiality. The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (NCVHS) has carefully considered the implications of the NHIN for health privacy and confidentiality. This report is based on a series of five hearings in 2005 held by the NCVHS Subcommittee on Privacy and Confidentiality. Three hearings were held in Washington, and one each in Chicago and San Francisco. Each hearing focused on different individuals and groups concerned about health information privacy and confidentiality, including hospitals, providers, payers, medical informatics experts, ethicists, integrated health systems, Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs), and consumer and patient advocacy groups. We also heard testimony from representatives of nationwide health networks in Australia, Canada, and Denmark. The Subcommittee then held a series of meetings open to the public and telephone conference calls to discuss its findings and prepare a report for the Committee to submit to HHS. This report contains the following seven sections: (A) definitions; (B) the importance of privacy and confidentiality; (C) the role of individuals; (D) controlled disclosure of personal health information; (E) regulatory issues; (F) secondary uses of personal health information; and (G) establishing and maintaining public trust.
@misc{
 title = {Privacy and Confidentiality in the Nationwide Health Information Network},
 type = {misc},
 year = {2006},
 keywords = {health-it,healthcare,privacy,summarized},
 websites = {http://www.ncvhs.hhs.gov/060622lt.htm},
 month = {6},
 institution = {National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics},
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 abstract = {The Nationwide Health Information Network (NHIN), on which the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is taking the lead, has the potential to enhance health care quality, increase efficiency, and promote public health. The NHIN also creates new challenges to and opportunities for safeguarding health privacy and confidentiality. The National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics (NCVHS) has carefully considered the implications of the NHIN for health privacy and confidentiality. This report is based on a series of five hearings in 2005 held by the NCVHS Subcommittee on Privacy and Confidentiality. Three hearings were held in Washington, and one each in Chicago and San Francisco. Each hearing focused on different individuals and groups concerned about health information privacy and confidentiality, including hospitals, providers, payers, medical informatics experts, ethicists, integrated health systems, Regional Health Information Organizations (RHIOs), and consumer and patient advocacy groups. We also heard testimony from representatives of nationwide health networks in Australia, Canada, and Denmark. The Subcommittee then held a series of meetings open to the public and telephone conference calls to discuss its findings and prepare a report for the Committee to submit to HHS. This report contains the following seven sections: (A) definitions; (B) the importance of privacy and confidentiality; (C) the role of individuals; (D) controlled disclosure of personal health information; (E) regulatory issues; (F) secondary uses of personal health information; and (G) establishing and maintaining public trust.},
 bibtype = {misc},
 author = {Cohn, Simon P}
}
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