General practice characteristics associated with rates of testing and detection of hepatitis C: cross-sectional study in Nottingham and Derbyshire. Coupland, C., Hippisley-Cox, J., Smith, S., Irving, W., Pringle, M., Ryder, S., Neal, K., Cater, R., Thomson, B., Pugh, S., Bicknell, M., & Bullock, D. The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners, 56(529):620--623, August, 2006.
abstract   bibtex   
The aim of this study was to determine general practice characteristics associated with testing rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the proportion of tests with a positive result. The study included all patients tested for HCV from all general practices in the primary care trusts in Nottingham and Southern Derbyshire, UK over 2 years. There was a large variation between practices in HCV testing rates and the proportion of positive tests. Single-handed practices had higher testing rates and rates of positive results. Practices where at least half of the GPs were female had higher testing rates but lower positivity rates. The variation observed was not explained by deprivation or rurality of the practice.
@article{coupland_general_2006,
	title = {General practice characteristics associated with rates of testing and detection of hepatitis {C}: cross-sectional study in {Nottingham} and {Derbyshire}},
	volume = {56},
	issn = {0960-1643},
	shorttitle = {General practice characteristics associated with rates of testing and detection of hepatitis {C}},
	abstract = {The aim of this study was to determine general practice characteristics associated with testing rates for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and the proportion of tests with a positive result. The study included all patients tested for HCV from all general practices in the primary care trusts in Nottingham and Southern Derbyshire, UK over 2 years. There was a large variation between practices in HCV testing rates and the proportion of positive tests. Single-handed practices had higher testing rates and rates of positive results. Practices where at least half of the GPs were female had higher testing rates but lower positivity rates. The variation observed was not explained by deprivation or rurality of the practice.},
	language = {eng},
	number = {529},
	journal = {The British Journal of General Practice: The Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners},
	author = {Coupland, Carol and Hippisley-Cox, Julia and Smith, Sherie and Irving, Will and Pringle, Mike and Ryder, Steve and Neal, Keith and Cater, Ruth and Thomson, Brian and Pugh, Simon and Bicknell, Marcus and Bullock, David},
	month = aug,
	year = {2006},
	pmid = {16882381},
	pmcid = {PMC1874527},
	keywords = {Adult, Cross-Sectional Studies, England, Family Practice, Female, Hepatitis C, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Physician's Practice Patterns, Predictive Value of Tests, Rural Health Services, Socioeconomic Factors},
	pages = {620--623}
}
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