The Context-Specific Proportion Congruent Stroop Effect: Location as a Contextual Cue. Crump, M. J. C., Gong, Z., & Milliken, B. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 13(2):316–321, 2006.
The Context-Specific Proportion Congruent Stroop Effect: Location as a Contextual Cue [pdf]Pdf  doi  abstract   bibtex   
The Stroop effect has been shown to depend on the relative proportion of congruent and incongruent trials. This effect is commonly attributed to experiment-wide word-reading strategies that change as a function of proportion congruent. Recently, Jacoby, Lindsay, and Hessels (2003) reported an item-specific proportion congruent effect that cannot be due to these strategies and instead may reflect rapid, stimulus driven control over word-reading processes. However, an item-specific proportion congruent effect may also reflect learned associations between color word identities and responses. In two experiments, we demonstrate a context-specific proportion congruent effect that cannot be explained by such word\textendashresponse associations. Our results suggest that processes other than learning of word\textendashresponse associations can produce contextual control over Stroop interference.
@article{Crumpcontextspecificproportioncongruent2006,
  title = {The Context-Specific Proportion Congruent {{Stroop}} Effect: {{Location}} as a Contextual Cue},
  volume = {13},
  doi = {10.3758/bf03193850},
  shorttitle = {The Context-Specific Proportion Congruent {{Stroop}} Effect},
  abstract = {The Stroop effect has been shown to depend on the relative proportion of congruent and incongruent trials. This effect is commonly attributed to experiment-wide word-reading strategies that change as a function of proportion congruent. Recently, Jacoby, Lindsay, and Hessels (2003) reported an item-specific proportion congruent effect that cannot be due to these strategies and instead may reflect rapid, stimulus driven control over word-reading processes. However, an item-specific proportion congruent effect may also reflect learned associations between color word identities and responses. In two experiments, we demonstrate a context-specific proportion congruent effect that cannot be explained by such word\textendash{}response associations. Our results suggest that processes other than learning of word\textendash{}response associations can produce contextual control over Stroop interference.},
  number = {2},
  journal = {Psychonomic Bulletin \& Review},
  author = {Crump, M. J. C. and Gong, Zhiyu and Milliken, Bruce},
  year = {2006},
  pages = {316--321},
  url_pdf = {files/734/CGM2006.pdf}
}
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