Fusing two cytochromes b of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1 using various linkers defines a set of protein templates for asymmetric mutagenesis. Czapla, M., Borek, A., Sarewicz, M., & Osyczka, A. Protein Engineering, Design and Selection, 25(1):11.
Fusing two cytochromes b of Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1 using various linkers defines a set of protein templates for asymmetric mutagenesis [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III), one of the key enzymes of biological energy conversion, is a functional homodimer in which each monomer contains three catalytic subunits: cytochrome c1, the iron-sulfur subunit and cytochrome b. The latter is composed of eight transmembrane \${\textbackslash}alpha\$-helices which, in duplicate, form a hydrophobic core of a dimer. We show that two cytochromes b can be fused into one 16-helical subunit using a number of different peptide linkers that vary in length but all connect the C-terminus of one cytochrome with the N-terminus of the other. The fusion proteins replace two cytochromes b in the dimer defining a set of available protein templates for introducing mutations that allow breaking symmetry of a dimer. A more detailed comparison of the form with the shortest, 3 amino acid, linker to the form with 12 amino acid linker established that both forms display similar level of structural plasticity to accommodate several, but not all, asymmetric patterns of mutations that knock out individual segments of cofactor chains. While the system based on a fused gene does not allow for the assessments of the functionality of electron-transfer paths in vivo, the family of proteins with fused cytochrome b offers attractive model for detailed investigations of molecular mechanism of catalysis at in vitro/reconstitution level.
@article{czapla_fusing_nodate,
	title = {Fusing two cytochromes b of {Rhodobacter} capsulatus cytochrome bc1 using various linkers defines a set of protein templates for asymmetric mutagenesis},
	volume = {25},
	url = {http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/oup/peds/2012/00000025/00000001/art00003},
	doi = {<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/protein/gzr055">http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/protein/gzr055</a>},
	abstract = {Cytochrome bc1 (mitochondrial complex III), one of the key enzymes of biological energy conversion, is a functional homodimer in which each monomer contains three catalytic subunits: cytochrome c1, the iron-sulfur subunit and cytochrome b. The latter is composed of eight transmembrane \${\textbackslash}alpha\$-helices which, in duplicate, form a hydrophobic core of a dimer. We show that two cytochromes b can be fused into one 16-helical subunit using a number of different peptide linkers that vary in length but all connect the C-terminus of one cytochrome with the N-terminus of the other. The fusion proteins replace two cytochromes b in the dimer defining a set of available protein templates for introducing mutations that allow breaking symmetry of a dimer. A more detailed comparison of the form with the shortest, 3 amino acid, linker to the form with 12 amino acid linker established that both forms display similar level of structural plasticity to accommodate several, but not all, asymmetric patterns of mutations that knock out individual segments of cofactor chains. While the system based on a fused gene does not allow for the assessments of the functionality of electron-transfer paths in vivo, the family of proteins with fused cytochrome b offers attractive model for detailed investigations of molecular mechanism of catalysis at in vitro/reconstitution level.},
	number = {1},
	journal = {Protein Engineering, Design and Selection},
	author = {Czapla, Monika and Borek, Arkadiusz and Sarewicz, Marcin and Osyczka, Artur},
	pages = {11}
}

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