Post-Fire Legacy of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities in the Swedish Boreal Forest in Relation to Fire Severity and Logging Intensity. Dahlberg, A.; Schimmel, J.; Taylor, A. F. S.; and Johannesson, H. 100(2):151–161.
Post-Fire Legacy of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities in the Swedish Boreal Forest in Relation to Fire Severity and Logging Intensity [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Swedish foresters are placing increasing reliance in burning of forestland and green tree retention, in order to enhance biodiversity in the Swedish boreal forests. However, much remains to be learned about how to optimise nature conservation goals by different logging and burning procedures. We monitored the survival of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi as mycorrhizas, at a clear-cut, a seed tree stand and an uncut stand of Scots pine in central Sweden, with and without burning at two levels of fire severity. The abundance of mycorrhizas and the EM fungal diversity declined with increased logging intensity and with increased depth of burn. Deep burning fires in combination with logging or fire-caused tree mortality can kill much of the existing EM community. Logging intensity, fire intensity and fire severity are all factors that can be manipulated, thus changing the effects on EM fungi and other soil biota.
@article{dahlbergPostfireLegacyEctomycorrhizal2001,
  title = {Post-Fire Legacy of Ectomycorrhizal Fungal Communities in the {{Swedish}} Boreal Forest in Relation to Fire Severity and Logging Intensity},
  author = {Dahlberg, Anders and Schimmel, Johnny and Taylor, Andy F. S. and Johannesson, Hanna},
  date = {2001-08},
  journaltitle = {Biological Conservation},
  volume = {100},
  pages = {151--161},
  issn = {0006-3207},
  doi = {10.1016/s0006-3207(00)00230-5},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/14074696},
  abstract = {Swedish foresters are placing increasing reliance in burning of forestland and green tree retention, in order to enhance biodiversity in the Swedish boreal forests. However, much remains to be learned about how to optimise nature conservation goals by different logging and burning procedures. We monitored the survival of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi as mycorrhizas, at a clear-cut, a seed tree stand and an uncut stand of Scots pine in central Sweden, with and without burning at two levels of fire severity. The abundance of mycorrhizas and the EM fungal diversity declined with increased logging intensity and with increased depth of burn. Deep burning fires in combination with logging or fire-caused tree mortality can kill much of the existing EM community. Logging intensity, fire intensity and fire severity are all factors that can be manipulated, thus changing the effects on EM fungi and other soil biota.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14074696,~to-add-doi-URL,boreal-forests,disasters,fire-severity,forest-fires,forest-management,forest-resources,logging,mycorrhizal-fungi,sweden,wildfires},
  number = {2}
}
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