Communicating with the Family for the Child's Best Chance for Success. Dattke, J. NAMTA Journal, 39(3):121–129, 2014.
Communicating with the Family for the Child's Best Chance for Success [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
Joachim Dattke describes a holistic approach to supporting the needs of the family when a child has a disability. The parent and child benefit from a two-pronged approach: working with doctors, psychologists, and therapists in clinic-based settings, and working with educators in schools and parent-child groups. He defines the importance of developing a personalized learning environment that implements specific aids and attainable objectives for each child. Approaching parents with empathy elicits the change of perspective that is needed for the family to understand how the child sees the world. Professor Dattke gives special appreciation to the Montessori educator who can "identify critical development periods in the child and look for objects and action sequences that the child may be interested in" and who prevent social exclusion by actively involving children in their social environment. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014. Translation and editing assistance provided by Barbara Luborsky and Catherine Nehring.]
@article{dattke_communicating_2014,
	title = {Communicating with the {Family} for the {Child}'s {Best} {Chance} for {Success}},
	volume = {39},
	issn = {1522-9734},
	url = {https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1183210},
	abstract = {Joachim Dattke describes a holistic approach to supporting the needs of the family when a child has a disability. The parent and child benefit from a two-pronged approach: working with doctors, psychologists, and therapists in clinic-based settings, and working with educators in schools and parent-child groups. He defines the importance of developing a personalized learning environment that implements specific aids and attainable objectives for each child. Approaching parents with empathy elicits the change of perspective that is needed for the family to understand how the child sees the world. Professor Dattke gives special appreciation to the Montessori educator who can "identify critical development periods in the child and look for objects and action sequences that the child may be interested in" and who prevent social exclusion by actively involving children in their social environment. [This talk was presented at the NAMTA conference titled "Building the Inclusive Montessori Community," Phoenix, AZ, January 16-19, 2014. Translation and editing assistance provided by Barbara Luborsky and Catherine Nehring.]},
	language = {en},
	number = {3},
	journal = {NAMTA Journal},
	author = {Dattke, Joachim},
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Montessori Method, Disabilities, Individualized Instruction, Success, Teacher Student Relationship, Elementary Secondary Education, Holistic Approach, Parent Teacher Cooperation, Family Programs, Communication Strategies, Family Needs, Individualized Family Service Plans, Partnerships in Education},
	pages = {121--129}
}
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