Shifting liberal and conservative attitudes using moral foundations theory. Day, M. V; Fiske, S. T; Downing, E. L; and Trail, T. E Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull., 40(12):1559--1573, December, 2014. 00000
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People's social and political opinions are grounded in their moral concerns about right and wrong. We examine whether five moral foundations--harm, fairness, ingroup, authority, and purity--can influence political attitudes of liberals and conservatives across a variety of issues. Framing issues using moral foundations may change political attitudes in at least two possible ways: (a) Entrenching: Relevant moral foundations will strengthen existing political attitudes when framing pro-attitudinal issues (e.g., conservatives exposed to a free-market economic stance) and (b) Persuasion: Mere presence of relevant moral foundations may also alter political attitudes in counter-attitudinal directions (e.g., conservatives exposed to an economic regulation stance). Studies 1 and 2 support the entrenching hypothesis. Relevant moral foundation-based frames bolstered political attitudes for conservatives (Study 1) and liberals (Study 2). Only Study 2 partially supports the persuasion hypothesis. Conservative-relevant moral frames of liberal issues increased conservatives' liberal attitudes.
@article{day_shifting_2014,
	title = {Shifting liberal and conservative attitudes using moral foundations theory},
	volume = {40},
	issn = {0146-1672},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146167214551152},
	doi = {10.1177/0146167214551152},
	abstract = {People's social and political opinions are grounded in their moral
concerns about right and wrong. We examine whether five moral
foundations--harm, fairness, ingroup, authority, and purity--can influence
political attitudes of liberals and conservatives across a variety of
issues. Framing issues using moral foundations may change political
attitudes in at least two possible ways: (a) Entrenching: Relevant moral
foundations will strengthen existing political attitudes when framing
pro-attitudinal issues (e.g., conservatives exposed to a free-market
economic stance) and (b) Persuasion: Mere presence of relevant moral
foundations may also alter political attitudes in counter-attitudinal
directions (e.g., conservatives exposed to an economic regulation stance).
Studies 1 and 2 support the entrenching hypothesis. Relevant moral
foundation-based frames bolstered political attitudes for conservatives
(Study 1) and liberals (Study 2). Only Study 2 partially supports the
persuasion hypothesis. Conservative-relevant moral frames of liberal
issues increased conservatives' liberal attitudes.},
	number = {12},
	journal = {Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull.},
	author = {Day, Martin V and Fiske, Susan T and Downing, Emily L and Trail, Thomas E},
	month = dec,
	year = {2014},
	note = {00000},
	keywords = {Sep 20 import, attitudes, duplicate, ideology, moral foundations, morality, politics},
	pages = {1559--1573}
}
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