The Global Spectrum of Plant Form and Function. D́ıaz, S.; Kattge, J.; Cornelissen, J. H. C.; Wright, I. J.; Lavorel, S.; Dray, S.; Reu, B.; Kleyer, M.; Wirth, C.; Colin Prentice, I.; Garnier, E.; Bönisch, G.; Westoby, M.; Poorter, H.; Reich, P. B.; Moles, A. T.; Dickie, J.; Gillison, A. N.; Zanne, A. E.; Chave, J.; Joseph Wright, S.; Sheremet'ev, S. N.; Jactel, H.; Baraloto, C.; Cerabolini, B.; Pierce, S.; Shipley, B.; Kirkup, D.; Casanoves, F.; Joswig, J. S.; Günther, A.; Falczuk, V.; Rüger, N.; Mahecha, M. D.; and Gorné, L. D. 529(7585):167–171.
The Global Spectrum of Plant Form and Function [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Headlines] The authors found that the key elements of plant form and function, analysed at global scale, are largely concentrated into a two-dimensional plane indexed by the size of whole plants and organs on the one hand, and the construction costs for photosynthetic leaf area, on the other. [Abstract] Earth is home to a remarkable diversity of plant forms and life histories, yet comparatively few essential trait combinations have proved evolutionarily viable in today's terrestrial biosphere. By analysing worldwide variation in six major traits critical to growth, survival and reproduction within the largest sample of vascular plant species ever compiled, we found that occupancy of six-dimensional trait space is strongly concentrated, indicating coordination and trade-offs. Three-quarters of trait variation is captured in a two-dimensional global spectrum of plant form and function. One major dimension within this plane reflects the size of whole plants and their parts; the other represents the leaf economics spectrum, which balances leaf construction costs against growth potential. The global plant trait spectrum provides a backdrop for elucidating constraints on evolution, for functionally qualifying species and ecosystems, and for improving models that predict future vegetation based on continuous variation in plant form and function.
@article{diazGlobalSpectrumPlant2015,
  title = {The Global Spectrum of Plant Form and Function},
  author = {D́ıaz, Sandra and Kattge, Jens and Cornelissen, Johannes H. C. and Wright, Ian J. and Lavorel, Sandra and Dray, Stéphane and Reu, Björn and Kleyer, Michael and Wirth, Christian and Colin Prentice, I. and Garnier, Eric and Bönisch, Gerhard and Westoby, Mark and Poorter, Hendrik and Reich, Peter B. and Moles, Angela T. and Dickie, John and Gillison, Andrew N. and Zanne, Amy E. and Chave, Jérôme and Joseph Wright, S. and Sheremet'ev, Serge N. and Jactel, Hervé and Baraloto, Christopher and Cerabolini, Bruno and Pierce, Simon and Shipley, Bill and Kirkup, Donald and Casanoves, Fernando and Joswig, Julia S. and Günther, Angela and Falczuk, Valeria and Rüger, Nadja and Mahecha, Miguel D. and Gorné, Lucas D.},
  date = {2015-12},
  journaltitle = {Nature},
  volume = {529},
  pages = {167--171},
  issn = {0028-0836},
  doi = {10.1038/nature16489},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/nature16489},
  abstract = {[Headlines] The authors found that the key elements of plant form and function, analysed at global scale, are largely concentrated into a two-dimensional plane indexed by the size of whole plants and organs on the one hand, and the construction costs for photosynthetic leaf area, on the other.

[Abstract] Earth is home to a remarkable diversity of plant forms and life histories, yet comparatively few essential trait combinations have proved evolutionarily viable in today's terrestrial biosphere. By analysing worldwide variation in six major traits critical to growth, survival and reproduction within the largest sample of vascular plant species ever compiled, we found that occupancy of six-dimensional trait space is strongly concentrated, indicating coordination and trade-offs. Three-quarters of trait variation is captured in a two-dimensional global spectrum of plant form and function. One major dimension within this plane reflects the size of whole plants and their parts; the other represents the leaf economics spectrum, which balances leaf construction costs against growth potential. The global plant trait spectrum provides a backdrop for elucidating constraints on evolution, for functionally qualifying species and ecosystems, and for improving models that predict future vegetation based on continuous variation in plant form and function.},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13894469,~to-add-doi-URL,biodiversity,diversity,forest-resources,functional-traits,predictors,statistics,vegetation},
  number = {7585}
}
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