Interpreting the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System. De Groot, W. J. In Fourth Central Regional Fire Weather Committee Scientific and Technical Seminar, Proceedings, pages 3–14.
Interpreting the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] [::] A presentation made at the Fourth Central Region Fire Weather Committee Scientific and Technical Seminar, April 2, 1987, Winnipeg, Manitoba. [] Fire danger is defined by the Canadian Committee on Forest Fire Management (Merrill and Alexander 1987) as: [::] A general term used to express an assessment of both fixed and variable factors of the fire environment which determine the ease of ignition, rate of spread, difficulty of control and fire impact. [] The Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS) is the national system for rating fire danger in Canada. The Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System is a sub-system of the CFFDRS and has been in its present form since 1970, with the fourth version of the tables for the FWI System now being used (Canadian Forestry Service 1984; Van Wagner 1987). The purpose of the FWI System is to account for the effects of weather on forest fuels and forest fires. Other factors affecting fire danger (i.e., fuels, topography) are dealt with elsewhere in the CFFDRS. [] The FWI System is comprised of six components (see Fig. 1): three fuel moisture codes and three fire behavior indexes. Each component has its own scale of relative values. Even though the scales for the six components are different, all are structured so that a high value indicates more severe burning conditions. [] The FWI System uses temperature, relatively humidity, wind speed, and 24-hr precipitation values measured at noon Local Standard Time (LST). These values are used to predict the peak burning conditions that will occur during the heat of the day, near 1600 hr LST, assuming that the measured weather parameters follow a normal diurnal pattern (Turner and Lawson 1978; Van Wagner 1987). [] [...] [Concluding Remarks] An understanding of the sensitivity of the FWI System can only be gained by daily observation of the component values and changing weather conditions. By comparing fire activity (fire starts, rate of spread, difficulty of control, etc.) to the values produced by the FWI System, fire managers will gain an expertise in interpreting the FWI System. [] [...]
@incollection{degrootInterpretingCanadianForest1987,
  title = {Interpreting the {{Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index}} ({{FWI}}) {{System}}},
  booktitle = {Fourth {{Central Regional Fire Weather Committee Scientific}} and {{Technical Seminar}}, {{Proceedings}}},
  author = {De Groot, William J.},
  date = {1987},
  pages = {3--14},
  location = {{Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/14176512},
  abstract = {[Excerpt]

[::] A presentation made at the Fourth Central Region Fire Weather Committee Scientific and Technical Seminar, April 2, 1987, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

[] Fire danger is defined by the Canadian Committee on Forest Fire Management (Merrill and Alexander 1987) as: [::] A general term used to express an assessment of both fixed and variable factors of the fire environment which determine the ease of ignition, rate of spread, difficulty of control and fire impact.

[] The Canadian Forest Fire Danger Rating System (CFFDRS) is the national system for rating fire danger in Canada. The Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System is a sub-system of the CFFDRS and has been in its present form since 1970, with the fourth version of the tables for the FWI System now being used (Canadian Forestry Service 1984; Van Wagner 1987). The purpose of the FWI System is to account for the effects of weather on forest fuels and forest fires. Other factors affecting fire danger (i.e., fuels, topography) are dealt with elsewhere in the CFFDRS.

[] The FWI System is comprised of six components (see Fig. 1): three fuel moisture codes and three fire behavior indexes. Each component has its own scale of relative values. Even though the scales for the six components are different, all are structured so that a high value indicates more severe burning conditions.

[] The FWI System uses temperature, relatively humidity, wind speed, and 24-hr precipitation values measured at noon Local Standard Time (LST). These values are used to predict the peak burning conditions that will occur during the heat of the day, near 1600 hr LST, assuming that the measured weather parameters follow a normal diurnal pattern (Turner and Lawson 1978; Van Wagner 1987). 

[] [...]

[Concluding Remarks] An understanding of the sensitivity of the FWI System can only be gained by daily observation of the component values and changing weather conditions. By comparing fire activity (fire starts, rate of spread, difficulty of control, etc.) to the values produced by the FWI System, fire managers will gain an expertise in interpreting the FWI System.

[] [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-14176512,environmental-modelling,fire-weather-index,forest-fires,modelling,wildfires}
}
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