Reproducible Research: The Bottom Line. De Leeuw, J.
Reproducible Research: The Bottom Line [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
From the interesting and provocative paper by Buckheit and Donoho [2] we take the following quotation. When we publish articles containing figures which were generated by computer, we also publish the complete software environment which generated the figures. This principle is quite forcefully and recognizably motivated with problems in current research practice. Buckheit and Donoho have taken their inspiration from the ” Green” Stanford geophysicist Jon Claerbout (his views are expounded in more detail in [3]). They formulate what I shall call Claerbout's Principle. An article about computational science in a scientific publication is not the scholarship itself, it is merely advertising of the scholarship. The actual scholarship is the complete software development environment and the complete set of instructions which generated the figures. These are very commendable quotations, and I agree completely with them, but they do not go far enough. First, there is no reason to single out figures. The same ” Principle” obviously applies to tables, standard errors, and so on. The fact that figures often happen to be easier to reproduce, does not preclude that we should apply the same rule to any form of computer-generated output. Second, there is no reason to limit the Claerbout's Principle to published articles. We can make exactly the same statement about our lectures and teaching, certainly in the context of graduate teaching. We must be able to give our students our code and our graphics files, so that they can display and study them on their own computers (and not only on our workstations, or in crowded university labs). And third, and perhaps most importantly, it is not clearly defined what a ” software environment” is. Buckheit and Donoho apply the principle in such a way that everybody who wants to check their results is forced to buy MatLab® . Not Mathematica® , Macsyma® , or S-plus® . Those you may need to buy for other articles. This violates the Freeware Principle, advocated most vocally by Richard Stallman in the GNU Manifesto
@article{deleeuwReproducibleResearchBottom2001,
  title = {Reproducible {{Research}}: The {{Bottom Line}}},
  author = {De Leeuw, Jan},
  date = {2001},
  url = {http://escholarship.org/uc/item/9050x4r4},
  abstract = {From the interesting and provocative paper by Buckheit and Donoho [2] we take the following quotation. When we publish articles containing figures which were generated by computer, we also publish the complete software environment which generated the figures. This principle is quite forcefully and recognizably motivated with problems in current research practice. Buckheit and Donoho have taken their inspiration from the ” Green” Stanford geophysicist Jon Claerbout (his views are expounded in more detail in [3]). They formulate what I shall call Claerbout's Principle. An article about computational science in a scientific publication is not the scholarship itself, it is merely advertising of the scholarship. The actual scholarship is the complete software development environment and the complete set of instructions which generated the figures. These are very commendable quotations, and I agree completely with them, but they do not go far enough. First, there is no reason to single out figures. The same ” Principle” obviously applies to tables, standard errors, and so on. The fact that figures often happen to be easier to reproduce, does not preclude that we should apply the same rule to any form of computer-generated output. Second, there is no reason to limit the Claerbout's Principle to published articles. We can make exactly the same statement about our lectures and teaching, certainly in the context of graduate teaching. We must be able to give our students our code and our graphics files, so that they can display and study them on their own computers (and not only on our workstations, or in crowded university labs). And third, and perhaps most importantly, it is not clearly defined what a ” software environment” is. Buckheit and Donoho apply the principle in such a way that everybody who wants to check their results is forced to buy MatLab® . Not Mathematica® , Macsyma® , or S-plus® . Those you may need to buy for other articles. This violates the Freeware Principle, advocated most vocally by Richard Stallman in the GNU Manifesto},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-11709587,free-scientific-knowledge,hidden-knowledge,reproducibility,reproducible-research}
}
Downloads: 0