Impact of Field Release of Genetically-Modified Pseudomonas- Fluorescens on Indigenous Microbial-Populations of Wheat. Deleij, F.; Sutton, E., J.; Whipps, J., M.; Fenlon, J., S.; and Lynch, J., M. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 61(9):3443-3453, 1995.
abstract   bibtex   
In a field release experiment, an isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens, which was chromosomally modified with two reporter gene cassettes (lacZY and Kan(r)-xylE), was applied to spring wheat as a seed coating and subsequently as a foliar spray. The wild-type strain was isolated from the phylloplane of sugar beet but was found to be a common colonizer of both the rizosphere and phylloplane of wheat as well. The impact on the indigenous microbial populations resulting from release of this genetically modified microorganism (GMM) was compared with the impact of the unmodified, wild-type strain and a nontreated control until 1 month after harvest of the crop. The release of the P. fluorescens GMM and the unmodified, wild-type strain resulted in significant but transient perturbations of some of the culturable components of the indigenous microbial communities that inhabited the rhizosphere and phylloplane of wheat, but no significant perturbations of the indigenous culturable microbial populations in nonrhizosphere soil were found. Fast-growing organisms that did not produce resting structures (for example, fluorescent pseudomonads and yeasts) seemed to be most sensitive to perturbation. In terms of hazard and risk to the environment, the observed microbial perturbations that resulted from this GMM release may be considered minor for several reasons. First, the recombinant P. fluorescens strain caused changes that were, in general, not significantly different from those caused by the unmodified wild-type strain; second, perturbations resulting from bacterial inoculations were mainly small; and third, the release of bacteria had no obvious effects on plant growth and plant health.
@article{
 title = {Impact of Field Release of Genetically-Modified Pseudomonas- Fluorescens on Indigenous Microbial-Populations of Wheat},
 type = {article},
 year = {1995},
 pages = {3443-3453},
 volume = {61},
 websites = {<Go to ISI>://A1995RT79800039},
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 abstract = {In a field release experiment, an isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens, which was chromosomally modified with two reporter gene cassettes (lacZY and Kan(r)-xylE), was applied to spring wheat as a seed coating and subsequently as a foliar spray. The wild-type strain was isolated from the phylloplane of sugar beet but was found to be a common colonizer of both the rizosphere and phylloplane of wheat as well. The impact on the indigenous microbial populations resulting from release of this genetically modified microorganism (GMM) was compared with the impact of the unmodified, wild-type strain and a nontreated control until 1 month after harvest of the crop. The release of the P. fluorescens GMM and the unmodified, wild-type strain resulted in significant but transient perturbations of some of the culturable components of the indigenous microbial communities that inhabited the rhizosphere and phylloplane of wheat, but no significant perturbations of the indigenous culturable microbial populations in nonrhizosphere soil were found. Fast-growing organisms that did not produce resting structures (for example, fluorescent pseudomonads and yeasts) seemed to be most sensitive to perturbation. In terms of hazard and risk to the environment, the observed microbial perturbations that resulted from this GMM release may be considered minor for several reasons. First, the recombinant P. fluorescens strain caused changes that were, in general, not significantly different from those caused by the unmodified wild-type strain; second, perturbations resulting from bacterial inoculations were mainly small; and third, the release of bacteria had no obvious effects on plant growth and plant health.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Deleij, Faam and Sutton, E J and Whipps, J M and Fenlon, J S and Lynch, J M},
 journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
 number = {9}
}
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