2014 Was the Hottest Year on Record. Deng, B.
2014 Was the Hottest Year on Record [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt] This past year was the hottest since at least 1891, the Japan Meteorological Agency said on 5 January. According to the JMA, the average temperature in 2014 was 0.27\,°C warmer than the 1981 to 2010 baseline average. [\n] [...] The warmth in 2014 is also notable for another reason: the absence of El Niño. Three years that were previously considered to be the hottest in the global record – 2010, 2005 and 1998 – got a boost from the weather pattern known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, which pushes up air temperatures. [...] Although Pacific temperatures were high in 2014, atmospheric conditions did not allow El Niño to form. ” It is surprising to have record heat in a year without strong El Niño,” says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. It is a reminder that the Earth is heating up quickly, he adds. [\n] [...] The record warmth in 2014 does not indicate a major change in the continuing warming trend, scientists say. ” It's important to remember that we're talking about a very small difference between this record and the last,” says Oppenheimer. The JMA's data show 2014's high to be 0.05°C higher than the previous record. Still, he says, ” this should chasten sceptics who have used the past decade's temperatures to deny that climate change is happening. It's a reminder that variability happens in both directions, up as well as down.”
@article{deng2014WasHottest2015,
  title = {2014 Was the Hottest Year on Record},
  author = {Deng, Boer},
  date = {2015-01},
  journaltitle = {Nature},
  issn = {1476-4687},
  doi = {10.1038/nature.2015.16674},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1038/nature.2015.16674},
  abstract = {[Excerpt] This past year was the hottest since at least 1891, the Japan Meteorological Agency said on 5 January. According to the JMA, the average temperature in 2014 was 0.27\,°C warmer than the 1981 to 2010 baseline average.

[\textbackslash n] [...] The warmth in 2014 is also notable for another reason: the absence of El Niño. Three years that were previously considered to be the hottest in the global record -- 2010, 2005 and 1998 -- got a boost from the weather pattern known as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, which pushes up air temperatures. [...] Although Pacific temperatures were high in 2014, atmospheric conditions did not allow El Niño to form. ” It is surprising to have record heat in a year without strong El Niño,” says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate scientist at Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey. It is a reminder that the Earth is heating up quickly, he adds.

[\textbackslash n] [...] The record warmth in 2014 does not indicate a major change in the continuing warming trend, scientists say. ” It's important to remember that we're talking about a very small difference between this record and the last,” says Oppenheimer. The JMA's data show 2014's high to be 0.05°C higher than the previous record.

Still, he says, ” this should chasten sceptics who have used the past decade's temperatures to deny that climate change is happening. It's a reminder that variability happens in both directions, up as well as down.”},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13477654,climate-change,climate-extremes,global-scale,global-warming,temperature}
}
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