Optimal use of visual information in adolescents and young adults with developmental coordination disorder. de Oliveira, R., F.; Billington, J.; and Wann, J., P. Experimental brain research, 232(9):2989-95, 2014.
Optimal use of visual information in adolescents and young adults with developmental coordination disorder. [pdf]Paper  Optimal use of visual information in adolescents and young adults with developmental coordination disorder. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
Recent reports offer contrasting views on whether or not the use of online visual control is impaired in individuals with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). This study explored the optimal temporal basis for processing and using visual information in adolescents and young adults with DCD. Participants were 22 adolescents and young adults (12 males and 10 females; M = 19 years, SD = 3). Half had been diagnosed with DCD as children and still performed poorly on the movement assessment battery for children (DCD group; n = 11), and half reported typical development (TD group; n = 11) and were age- and gender-matched with the DCD group. We used performance on a steering task as a measure of information processing and examined the use of advance visual information. The conditions varied the duration of advance visual information: 125, 250, 500, 750, and 1,000 ms. With increased duration of advance visual information, the TD group showed a pattern of linear improvement. For the DCD group, however, the pattern was best described by a U-curve where optimal performance occurred with about 750 ms of advance information. The results suggest that the DCD group has an underlying preference for immediate online processing of visual information. The exact timing for optimal online control may depend crucially on the task, but too much advance information is detrimental to performance.
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 title = {Optimal use of visual information in adolescents and young adults with developmental coordination disorder.},
 type = {article},
 year = {2014},
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 keywords = {dyspraxia,movement,planning,visual processing,visuomotor control},
 pages = {2989-95},
 volume = {232},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24838558},
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 abstract = {Recent reports offer contrasting views on whether or not the use of online visual control is impaired in individuals with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). This study explored the optimal temporal basis for processing and using visual information in adolescents and young adults with DCD. Participants were 22 adolescents and young adults (12 males and 10 females; M = 19 years, SD = 3). Half had been diagnosed with DCD as children and still performed poorly on the movement assessment battery for children (DCD group; n = 11), and half reported typical development (TD group; n = 11) and were age- and gender-matched with the DCD group. We used performance on a steering task as a measure of information processing and examined the use of advance visual information. The conditions varied the duration of advance visual information: 125, 250, 500, 750, and 1,000 ms. With increased duration of advance visual information, the TD group showed a pattern of linear improvement. For the DCD group, however, the pattern was best described by a U-curve where optimal performance occurred with about 750 ms of advance information. The results suggest that the DCD group has an underlying preference for immediate online processing of visual information. The exact timing for optimal online control may depend crucially on the task, but too much advance information is detrimental to performance.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {de Oliveira, Rita F and Billington, Jac and Wann, John P},
 journal = {Experimental brain research},
 number = {9}
}
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