Damaging Poplar Insects - Internationally Important Species. de Tillesse, V.; Nef, L.; Charles, J.; Hopkin, A.; and Augustin, S. International Poplar Commission, FAO.
Damaging Poplar Insects - Internationally Important Species [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
[Excerpt: Introduction] In 1956, the FAO published the book ” Poplars and Willows in wood production and land use”, which brought together information on the genetics, improvement, growth and enemies, etc of these genera of major economic importance.. The introduction emphasised the role of Salicaceae in wood production, providing a renewable primary resource with a variety of uses. This publication led to outstanding collaboration between scientists and practical users from many countries, which resulted, inter alia, in the creation of the International Poplar Commission (IPC) in 1957. [\n] Within this collaborative framework, scientists from various disciplines worked together to improve the quality and quantity of poplar production. It was in the spirit of this framework that the second completely redrafted version of the work ” Poplars and Willows” was produced in 1980, for which most chapters were written by teams of specialists. [\n] These books were very successful but, despite continuing demand, both eventually went out of print. Economic constraints prevented the production of further editions. With this in mind during the Budapest congress in 1996, the FAO and IPC management envisaged the preparation of booklets covering the same content, but to be published over a period of time, preferably as an Internet edition. Within this context, the chairman of the IPC Working Party on insects (L. Nef) was asked to draft a text on insect pests of international importance. [\n] This request was fortunately preceded by a study of poplar, willow and alder pests (Morris, 1986); by a more recent publication aimed at providing a reasonably exhaustive list of the main poplar pests at an international level (Nef & Menu, 1994); and by the information contained in the national reports presented to the IPC congress in Budapest, and collected by the secretary of the insect working party (Augustin1 1996). This groundwork was extensively supplemented by a detailed check of the publications cited in the CD-ROM ” Tree CD” (Forestry Abstracts) and by data obtained directly from working party members throughout the world, providing a solid foundation for the present work. [\n] This wealth of information substantiates the assertion of the insect working party chairman (on the fiftieth anniversary of the IPC during the World Forest Congress in Antalia (1997)) that: ” knowledge of the biology, distribution and damage caused by insects is sufficient for current practice. In the future, only information on large biogeographical variations, or of the appearance of new pests, will be of importance. The next problem is protection against damage. [\n] This will make use of integrated control where clonal resistance will constitute the primary protective measure. Today, scientists have already gathered extensive relevant data which can be applied by practical users.” This last field of knowledge is a recent development, and, although it will always remain a step behind the progress of the breeders, it should be seen as useful, if not essential, to communicate progress to poplar growers: that is a major aim of this publication.
@book{detillesseDamagingPoplarInsects2007,
  title = {Damaging Poplar Insects - {{Internationally}} Important Species},
  author = {de Tillesse, Veronique and Nef, Ludovic and Charles, John and Hopkin, Anthony and Augustin, Sylvie},
  date = {2007},
  publisher = {{International Poplar Commission, FAO}},
  location = {{Rome}},
  url = {http://mfkp.org/INRMM/article/13778844},
  abstract = {[Excerpt: Introduction] In 1956, the FAO published the book ” Poplars and Willows in wood production and land use”, which brought together information on the genetics, improvement, growth and enemies, etc of these genera of major economic importance.. The introduction emphasised the role of Salicaceae in wood production, providing a renewable primary resource with a variety of uses. This publication led to outstanding collaboration between scientists and practical users from many countries, which resulted, inter alia, in the creation of the International Poplar Commission (IPC) in 1957.

[\textbackslash n] Within this collaborative framework, scientists from various disciplines worked together to improve the quality and quantity of poplar production. It was in the spirit of this framework that the second completely redrafted version of the work ” Poplars and Willows” was produced in 1980, for which most chapters were written by teams of specialists.

[\textbackslash n] These books were very successful but, despite continuing demand, both eventually went out of print. Economic constraints prevented the production of further editions. With this in mind during the Budapest congress in 1996, the FAO and IPC management envisaged the preparation of booklets covering the same content, but to be published over a period of time, preferably as an Internet edition. Within this context, the chairman of the IPC Working Party on insects (L. Nef) was asked to draft a text on insect pests of international importance.

[\textbackslash n] This request was fortunately preceded by a study of poplar, willow and alder pests (Morris, 1986); by a more recent publication aimed at providing a reasonably exhaustive list of the main poplar pests at an international level (Nef \& Menu, 1994); and by the information contained in the national reports presented to the IPC congress in Budapest, and collected by the secretary of the insect working party (Augustin1 1996). This groundwork was extensively supplemented by a detailed check of the publications cited in the CD-ROM ” Tree CD” (Forestry Abstracts) and by data obtained directly from working party members throughout the world, providing a solid foundation for the present work.

[\textbackslash n] This wealth of information substantiates the assertion of the insect working party chairman (on the fiftieth anniversary of the IPC during the World Forest Congress in Antalia (1997)) that: ” knowledge of the biology, distribution and damage caused by insects is sufficient for current practice. In the future, only information on large biogeographical variations, or of the appearance of new pests, will be of importance. The next problem is protection against damage. 

[\textbackslash n] This will make use of integrated control where clonal resistance will constitute the primary protective measure. Today, scientists have already gathered extensive relevant data which can be applied by practical users.” This last field of knowledge is a recent development, and, although it will always remain a step behind the progress of the breeders, it should be seen as useful, if not essential, to communicate progress to poplar growers: that is a major aim of this publication.},
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  options = {useprefix=true}
}
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