Making Forestry Decisions with Multiple Criteria: A Review and an Assessment. Diaz-Balteiro, L. and Romero, C. 255(8-9):3222–3241.
Making Forestry Decisions with Multiple Criteria: A Review and an Assessment [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
This paper provides a survey of the literature on multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) applications to forestry problems undertaken in the last 30 years or so. More than 250 references regarding 9 forestry topics and 9 different MCDM approaches have been categorized and evaluated. This provides a unified source of references that could be useful for forest management students, researchers and practitioners. The paper ends with an assessment of the literature presented, aiming to reach some conclusions, as well as indicate future trends in this line of research. [Excerpt: Introduction] Forest resource planning is a very complex problem mainly due to the multiplicity of wide-ranging criteria involved in the underlying decision-making process. Thus, every decision made affects criteria of different nature like [::(a)] Economic issues (e.g., timber, forage, livestock, hunting, etc.). [::(b)] Environmental issues (e.g., soil erosion, carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, etc.). [::(c)] Social issues (e.g., recreational activities, level of employment, population settlement, etc.). [\n] In accordance with these ideas, most public or private decision-makers involved in any type of forest planning problem have a preference structure embedding several decision-making criteria such as the ones described above. This is especially true in the case of publicly owned forests. Briefly, the optimization problem underlying most real forest planning problems needs to be formulated within the multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) paradigm. [\n] What is more, the complexity of most forestry problems is currently increasing because of the way in which different social groups or stakeholders perceive the relative importance of these criteria. Hence, the joint use of MCDM and group decision-making (GDM) approaches and techniques has turned out to be of paramount importance for some forestry problems. [...]
@article{diaz-balteiroMakingForestryDecisions2008,
  title = {Making Forestry Decisions with Multiple Criteria: A Review and an Assessment},
  author = {Diaz-Balteiro, Luis and Romero, Carlos},
  date = {2008-05},
  journaltitle = {Forest Ecology and Management},
  volume = {255},
  pages = {3222--3241},
  issn = {0378-1127},
  doi = {10.1016/j.foreco.2008.01.038},
  url = {https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2008.01.038},
  abstract = {This paper provides a survey of the literature on multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) applications to forestry problems undertaken in the last 30 years or so. More than 250 references regarding 9 forestry topics and 9 different MCDM approaches have been categorized and evaluated. This provides a unified source of references that could be useful for forest management students, researchers and practitioners. The paper ends with an assessment of the literature presented, aiming to reach some conclusions, as well as indicate future trends in this line of research.

[Excerpt: Introduction]

Forest resource planning is a very complex problem mainly due to the multiplicity of wide-ranging criteria involved in the underlying decision-making process. Thus, every decision made affects criteria of different nature like

[::(a)] Economic issues (e.g., timber, forage, livestock, hunting, etc.).

[::(b)] Environmental issues (e.g., soil erosion, carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, etc.).

[::(c)] Social issues (e.g., recreational activities, level of employment, population settlement, etc.).

[\textbackslash n] In accordance with these ideas, most public or private decision-makers involved in any type of forest planning problem have a preference structure embedding several decision-making criteria such as the ones described above. This is especially true in the case of publicly owned forests. Briefly, the optimization problem underlying most real forest planning problems needs to be formulated within the multiple criteria decision-making (MCDM) paradigm.

[\textbackslash n] What is more, the complexity of most forestry problems is currently increasing because of the way in which different social groups or stakeholders perceive the relative importance of these criteria. Hence, the joint use of MCDM and group decision-making (GDM) approaches and techniques has turned out to be of paramount importance for some forestry problems. [...]},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-12054288,biodiversity,carbon-mitigation,conservation,cultural-services,ecosystem-services,forest-management,forest-resources,integration-techniques,multi-criteria-decision-analysis,soil-erosion,soil-resources},
  number = {8-9}
}
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