Insights into the role of alternative splicing in plant temperature response. Dikaya, V., El Arbi, N., Rojas-Murcia, N., Nardeli, S. M., Goretti, D., & Schmid, M. Journal of Experimental Botany, June, 2021.
doi  abstract   bibtex   
Alternative splicing occurs in all eukaryotic organisms. Since the first description of multiexon genes and the splicing machinery, the field has expanded rapidly, especially in animals and yeast. However, our knowledge about splicing in plants is still quite fragmented. Though eukaryotes show some similarity in the composition and dynamics of the splicing machinery, observations of unique plant traits are only starting to emerge. For instance, plant alternative splicing is closely linked to their ability to perceive various environmental stimuli. Due to their sessile lifestyle, temperature is a central source of information allowing plants to adjust their development to match current growth conditions. Hence, seasonal temperature fluctuations and day-night cycles can strongly influence plant morphology across developmental stages. Here we discuss the available data about temperature-dependent alternative splicing in plants. Given its fragmented state it is not always possible to fit specific observations into a coherent picture, yet it is sufficient to estimate the complexity of this field and the need of further research. Better understanding of alternative splicing as a part of plant temperature response and adaptation may also prove to be a powerful tool for both, fundamental and applied sciences.
@article{dikaya_insights_2021,
	title = {Insights into the role of alternative splicing in plant temperature response},
	issn = {1460-2431},
	doi = {10/gkhp7j},
	abstract = {Alternative splicing occurs in all eukaryotic organisms. Since the first description of multiexon genes and the splicing machinery, the field has expanded rapidly, especially in animals and yeast. However, our knowledge about splicing in plants is still quite fragmented. Though eukaryotes show some similarity in the composition and dynamics of the splicing machinery, observations of unique plant traits are only starting to emerge. For instance, plant alternative splicing is closely linked to their ability to perceive various environmental stimuli. Due to their sessile lifestyle, temperature is a central source of information allowing plants to adjust their development to match current growth conditions. Hence, seasonal temperature fluctuations and day-night cycles can strongly influence plant morphology across developmental stages. Here we discuss the available data about temperature-dependent alternative splicing in plants. Given its fragmented state it is not always possible to fit specific observations into a coherent picture, yet it is sufficient to estimate the complexity of this field and the need of further research. Better understanding of alternative splicing as a part of plant temperature response and adaptation may also prove to be a powerful tool for both, fundamental and applied sciences.},
	language = {eng},
	journal = {Journal of Experimental Botany},
	author = {Dikaya, Varvara and El Arbi, Nabila and Rojas-Murcia, Nelson and Nardeli, Sarah Muniz and Goretti, Daniela and Schmid, Markus},
	month = jun,
	year = {2021},
	keywords = {Arabidopsis thaliana, alternative splicing, cold acclimation, heat acclimation, splicing factor, temperature adaptation, temperature response},
}

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