Certified nursing assistants' perspectives of nursing home residents' pain experience: communication patterns, cultural context, and the role of empathy. Dobbs, D.; Baker, T.; Carrion, I., V.; Vongxaiburana, E.; and Hyer, K. Pain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses, 15(1):87-96, American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc, 3, 2014.
abstract   bibtex   
This study explored the following issues related to pain management among nursing home (NH) residents: 1) communication patterns between NH residents and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) about pain; 2) how race and ethnicity influence NH residents' pain experiences; and 3) CNAs' personal experiences with pain that may affect their empathy toward the resident's pain experience. The study consisted of a convenience sample of four focus groups (n = 28) from a NH in central Florida. A content analysis approach was used. Data were analyzed with the use of Atlas.ti version 6.2. The content analysis identified four main themes: 1) attitudes as barriers to communication about resident pain care; 2) cultural, religious, and gender influences of resident pain care by CNAs; 3) the role of empathy in CNAs care of residents with pain; and 4) worker strategies to detect pain. Attitudes among CNAs about resident cognitive status and perceived resident burden need to be recognized as barriers to the detection and reporting of pain by CNAs and should be addressed. In addition, NHs should consider a person-centered approach to pain that is culturally competent given the cultural influences of both residents and staff. Finally, educational programs for CNAs that include empathy-inducing scenarios could potentially improve the care provided by CNAs when dealing with residents' pain.
@article{
 title = {Certified nursing assistants' perspectives of nursing home residents' pain experience: communication patterns, cultural context, and the role of empathy},
 type = {article},
 year = {2014},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 pages = {87-96},
 volume = {15},
 month = {3},
 publisher = {American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc},
 city = {School of Aging Studies, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. Electronic address: ddobbs@usf.edu.; School of Aging Studies, College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, Ta},
 id = {eb522752-7c79-3536-8b39-454bd4706233},
 created = {2016-08-20T16:52:06.000Z},
 file_attached = {false},
 profile_id = {217ced55-4c79-38dc-838b-4b5ea8df5597},
 group_id = {408d37d9-5f1b-3398-a9f5-5c1a487116d4},
 last_modified = {2017-03-14T09:54:45.334Z},
 read = {false},
 starred = {false},
 authored = {false},
 confirmed = {true},
 hidden = {false},
 source_type = {JOUR},
 notes = {ID: 68566; CI: Copyright (c) 2014; JID: 100890606; 2012/02/21 [received]; 2012/06/21 [revised]; 2012/06/22 [accepted]; 2012/08/18 [aheadofprint]; ppublish},
 folder_uuids = {82929786-d0cb-4865-ad8a-59a4ccc17176},
 private_publication = {false},
 abstract = {This study explored the following issues related to pain management among nursing home (NH) residents: 1) communication patterns between NH residents and certified nursing assistants (CNAs) about pain; 2) how race and ethnicity influence NH residents' pain experiences; and 3) CNAs' personal experiences with pain that may affect their empathy toward the resident's pain experience. The study consisted of a convenience sample of four focus groups (n = 28) from a NH in central Florida. A content analysis approach was used. Data were analyzed with the use of Atlas.ti version 6.2. The content analysis identified four main themes: 1) attitudes as barriers to communication about resident pain care; 2) cultural, religious, and gender influences of resident pain care by CNAs; 3) the role of empathy in CNAs care of residents with pain; and 4) worker strategies to detect pain. Attitudes among CNAs about resident cognitive status and perceived resident burden need to be recognized as barriers to the detection and reporting of pain by CNAs and should be addressed. In addition, NHs should consider a person-centered approach to pain that is culturally competent given the cultural influences of both residents and staff. Finally, educational programs for CNAs that include empathy-inducing scenarios could potentially improve the care provided by CNAs when dealing with residents' pain.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Dobbs, D and Baker, T and Carrion, I V and Vongxaiburana, E and Hyer, K},
 journal = {Pain management nursing : official journal of the American Society of Pain Management Nurses},
 number = {1}
}
Downloads: 0