A new ion mobility-linear ion trap instrument for complex mixture analysis. Donohoe, G., C.; Maleki, H.; Arndt, J., R.; Khakinejad, M.; Yi, J.; McBride, C.; Nurkiewicz, T., R.; and Valentine, S., J. Analytical chemistry, 86(16):8121-8, 8, 2014.
A new ion mobility-linear ion trap instrument for complex mixture analysis. [pdf]Paper  A new ion mobility-linear ion trap instrument for complex mixture analysis. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
A new instrument that couples a low-pressure drift tube with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer is demonstrated for complex mixture analysis. The combination of the low-pressure separation with the ion trapping capabilities provides several benefits for complex mixture analysis. These include high sensitivity, unique ion fragmentation capabilities, and high reproducibility. Even though the gas-phase separation and the mass measurement steps are each conducted in an ion filtering mode, detection limits for mobility-selected peptide ions are in the tens of attomole range. In addition to ion separation, the low-pressure drift tube can be used as an ion fragmentation cell yielding mobility-resolved fragment ions that can be subsequently analyzed by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) methods in the ion trap. Because of the ion trap configuration, these methods can be comprised of any number (limited by ion signal) of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) processes. The high reproducibility of the gas-phase separation allows for comparison of two-dimensional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS data sets in a pixel-by-pixel fashion without the need for data set alignment. These advantages are presented in model analyses representing mixtures encountered in proteomics and metabolomics experiments.
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 title = {A new ion mobility-linear ion trap instrument for complex mixture analysis.},
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 year = {2014},
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 abstract = {A new instrument that couples a low-pressure drift tube with a linear ion trap mass spectrometer is demonstrated for complex mixture analysis. The combination of the low-pressure separation with the ion trapping capabilities provides several benefits for complex mixture analysis. These include high sensitivity, unique ion fragmentation capabilities, and high reproducibility. Even though the gas-phase separation and the mass measurement steps are each conducted in an ion filtering mode, detection limits for mobility-selected peptide ions are in the tens of attomole range. In addition to ion separation, the low-pressure drift tube can be used as an ion fragmentation cell yielding mobility-resolved fragment ions that can be subsequently analyzed by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) methods in the ion trap. Because of the ion trap configuration, these methods can be comprised of any number (limited by ion signal) of collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) processes. The high reproducibility of the gas-phase separation allows for comparison of two-dimensional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS data sets in a pixel-by-pixel fashion without the need for data set alignment. These advantages are presented in model analyses representing mixtures encountered in proteomics and metabolomics experiments.},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Donohoe, Gregory C and Maleki, Hossein and Arndt, James R and Khakinejad, Mahdiar and Yi, Jinghai and McBride, Carroll and Nurkiewicz, Timothy R and Valentine, Stephen J},
 journal = {Analytical chemistry},
 number = {16}
}
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