Removal of microcystin-LR from spiked water using either activated carbon or anthracite as filter material. Drogui, P.; Daghrir, R.; Simard, M.; Sauvageau, C.; and Blais, J., F. Environmental technology, 33(4-6):381-91.
Removal of microcystin-LR from spiked water using either activated carbon or anthracite as filter material. [pdf]Paper  Removal of microcystin-LR from spiked water using either activated carbon or anthracite as filter material. [link]Website  abstract   bibtex   
The occurrence of cyanobacterial toxins (blue-green algae) in drinking water sources is a big concern for human health. Removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) from drinking water was evaluated at the laboratory pilot scale using either granular activated carbon (GAC) or powdered activated carbon (PAC) and compared with the treatment using anthracite as filter material. Virgin GAC was more effective at removing MC-LR (initial concentration ranging from 9 to 47 microg L(-1)) to reach the World Health Organization recommended level (1.0 microg L(-1)). When the GAC filter was colonized by bacteria, the filter became less effective at removing MC-LR owing to competitive reactions occurring between protein adsorption (released by bacteria) and MC-LR adsorption. Using PAC, the concentration of MC-LR decreased from 22 to 3 microg L(-1) (removal of 86% of MC-LR) by the addition of 100 mg PAC L(-1).
@article{
 title = {Removal of microcystin-LR from spiked water using either activated carbon or anthracite as filter material.},
 type = {article},
 identifiers = {[object Object]},
 keywords = {Bacterial Toxins,Bacterial Toxins: chemistry,Bacterial Toxins: isolation & purification,Charcoal,Charcoal: chemistry,Coal,Microcystins,Microcystins: chemistry,Microcystins: isolation & purification,Ultrafiltration,Ultrafiltration: methods,Water,Water Pollutants, Chemical,Water Pollutants, Chemical: chemistry,Water Pollutants, Chemical: isolation & purificati,Water Purification,Water Purification: instrumentation,Water: chemistry},
 pages = {381-91},
 volume = {33},
 websites = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22629609},
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 created = {2014-06-03T07:38:51.000Z},
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 abstract = {The occurrence of cyanobacterial toxins (blue-green algae) in drinking water sources is a big concern for human health. Removal of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) from drinking water was evaluated at the laboratory pilot scale using either granular activated carbon (GAC) or powdered activated carbon (PAC) and compared with the treatment using anthracite as filter material. Virgin GAC was more effective at removing MC-LR (initial concentration ranging from 9 to 47 microg L(-1)) to reach the World Health Organization recommended level (1.0 microg L(-1)). When the GAC filter was colonized by bacteria, the filter became less effective at removing MC-LR owing to competitive reactions occurring between protein adsorption (released by bacteria) and MC-LR adsorption. Using PAC, the concentration of MC-LR decreased from 22 to 3 microg L(-1) (removal of 86% of MC-LR) by the addition of 100 mg PAC L(-1).},
 bibtype = {article},
 author = {Drogui, Patrick and Daghrir, Rimeh and Simard, Marie-Christine and Sauvageau, Christine and Blais, Jean François},
 journal = {Environmental technology},
 number = {4-6}
}
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