(Re)colonisation in a snail’s pace: biodiversity monitoring of land gastropods in the “Biosphärenpark Wienerwald”. Duda, M.; Jaksch, K.; and Eschner, A. In Johnsbach, Austria, August, 2014. Talk
abstract   bibtex   
From April to October 2012 species diversity and abundances of land gastropods were analysed in 28 core forest areas which were put out of use a few years ago, as well as in 14 managed forests of the “Biosphärenpark Wienerwald”. Aim of this study was to document the starting effect of abandoning forestry operation on quantity and quality of land snail communities and predicting their future development. In total 951 living individuals and 2588 empty shells of 49 species were recorded at the monitored plots. The samples from the core areas showed more individuals and a higher diversity of living species, but the differences were statistically not significant. These results can be explained by (1) the relatively short period since the core areas have been put out of use and (2) the rather smooth transition between the two types of management. Similar results have been recorded in other monitoring projects concerning land snails but as well as other forest dwelling organisms, concluding that significant changes are due to long-term development. Therefore, positive impacts on the gastropod fauna can be expected in the core areas in medium to long-term period, resulting in an increase of the snail species diversity and abundances.
@inproceedings{ duda_recolonisation_2014,
  address = {Johnsbach, Austria},
  title = {(Re)colonisation in a snail’s pace: biodiversity monitoring of land gastropods in the “Biosphärenpark Wienerwald”},
  abstract = {From April to October 2012 species diversity and abundances of land gastropods were analysed in 28 core forest areas which were put out of use a few years ago, as well as in 14 managed forests of the “Biosphärenpark Wienerwald”. Aim of this study was to document the starting effect of abandoning forestry operation on quantity and quality of land snail communities and predicting their future development. In total 951 living individuals and 2588 empty shells of 49 species were recorded at the monitored plots. The samples from the core areas showed more individuals and a higher diversity of living species, but the differences were statistically not significant. These results can be explained by (1) the relatively short period since the core areas have been put out of use and (2) the rather smooth transition between the two types of management. Similar results have been recorded in other monitoring projects concerning land snails but as well as other forest dwelling organisms, concluding that significant changes are due to long-term development. Therefore, positive impacts on the gastropod fauna can be expected in the core areas in medium to long-term period, resulting in an increase of the snail species diversity and abundances.},
  language = {English},
  author = {Duda, Michael and Jaksch, Katharina and Eschner, Anita},
  month = {August},
  year = {2014},
  note = {Talk}
}
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