Patterns of Shrub Invasion into High Mountain Grasslands of the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria. Dullinger, S.; Dirnböck, T.; and Grabherr, G. 35(4):434–441.
abstract   bibtex   
Both land use and expected climate change will probably cause range shifts of tree and shrub species in the European Alps. Attempts to predict the magnitude and direction of these processes will produce reliable results only if they consider both abiotic habitat conditions and biotic interactions. In this study we analyze recruitment patterns of Pinus mugo Turra in different grassland communities of the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria. Pinus mugo is the most important invader of abandoned subalpine pastures in the area and the predominant woody plant at the current timberline. Results indicate strong dependence of colonization success on propagule pressure and differential invasibility of grassland types but only a marginal impact of local-scale site conditions, at least within the species' current altitudinal distribution limits. Because the grassland matrix at and above the current treeline is dominated by a particularly invasible grassland type, a possible climate change-driven upward movement of Pinus mugo shrublands may take place quite rapidly. In contrast, encroachment on abandoned subalpine pastures is frequently delayed by competition with vigorous grassland canopies.
@article{dullingerPatternsShrubInvasion2003,
  title = {Patterns of {{Shrub Invasion}} into {{High Mountain Grasslands}} of the {{Northern Calcareous Alps}}, {{Austria}}},
  author = {Dullinger, S. and Dirnböck, T. and Grabherr, G.},
  date = {2003},
  journaltitle = {Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research},
  volume = {35},
  pages = {434--441},
  abstract = {Both land use and expected climate change will probably cause range shifts of tree and shrub species in the European Alps. Attempts to predict the magnitude and direction of these processes will produce reliable results only if they consider both abiotic habitat conditions and biotic interactions. In this study we analyze recruitment patterns of Pinus mugo Turra in different grassland communities of the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria. Pinus mugo is the most important invader of abandoned subalpine pastures in the area and the predominant woody plant at the current timberline. Results indicate strong dependence of colonization success on propagule pressure and differential invasibility of grassland types but only a marginal impact of local-scale site conditions, at least within the species' current altitudinal distribution limits. Because the grassland matrix at and above the current treeline is dominated by a particularly invasible grassland type, a possible climate change-driven upward movement of Pinus mugo shrublands may take place quite rapidly. In contrast, encroachment on abandoned subalpine pastures is frequently delayed by competition with vigorous grassland canopies.},
  eprint = {1552344},
  eprinttype = {jstor},
  keywords = {*imported-from-citeulike-INRMM,~INRMM-MiD:c-13778887,austria,climate-change,grasslands,pinus-mugo},
  number = {4}
}
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