Early Math and Literacy Skills: Key Predictors of Later School Success. Duncan, G., J.; Dowsett, C.; and Lawrence, J., F. Early Math and Literacy Skills: Key Predictors of Later School Success, pages 55-73. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, 2, 2014.
abstract   bibtex   
Children's cognitive skills and socioemotional behaviors at school entry constitute the building blocks for the acquisition of later, more sophisticated skills. But discussions of preschool “quality” reveal little consensus regarding the relative importance of cognitive versus socioemotional skills for school readiness. Our chapter summarizes evidence showing that future school achievement is much less a function of a child's school-entry social and emotional development than his or her concrete literacy and numeracy skills. Ability to pay attention and engage in school tasks occupies an intermediate position. Expanding the conception of school “success” to include not only doing well on achievement tests but also completing high school and attending college, changes the picture somewhat. Avoiding persistently low math achievement matters the most for positive school attainment, but children with persistent antisocial behavior problems across middle childhood are also at elevated risk of low attainment.
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 abstract = {Children's cognitive skills and socioemotional behaviors at school entry constitute the building blocks for the acquisition of later, more sophisticated skills. But discussions of preschool “quality” reveal little consensus regarding the relative importance of cognitive versus socioemotional skills for school readiness. Our chapter summarizes evidence showing that future school achievement is much less a function of a child's school-entry social and emotional development than his or her concrete literacy and numeracy skills. Ability to pay attention and engage in school tasks occupies an intermediate position. Expanding the conception of school “success” to include not only doing well on achievement tests but also completing high school and attending college, changes the picture somewhat. Avoiding persistently low math achievement matters the most for positive school attainment, but children with persistent antisocial behavior problems across middle childhood are also at elevated risk of low attainment.},
 bibtype = {inBook},
 author = {Duncan, Greg J and Dowsett, C. and Lawrence, Joshua F},
 book = {Wellbeing in Children and Families}
}
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