Why Imitation, and Why Global?. Duro, P. Art History, 37(4):606--627, September, 2014.
Why Imitation, and Why Global? [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
Despite a growing body of recent work, imitation in art is still commonly confused with the practice of copying to the detriment of the many kinds of replication that are thereby negatively compared with notions of originality and authenticity. From antiquity to the present, the theory and practice of imitation has been central to the construction of art through many forms of repetition, such as appropriation, replication, quotation, reproduction, citation and reference. Yet it is the act of repetition that confers the quality of originality and authenticity on the model in the first place – a gesture of demarcation that serves to establish a hierarchy of value between copy and model and reinforce the perception that all forms of imitation necessarily run counter to the ideas of innovation or emulation. The present collection challenges these assumptions, and seeks to reveal the nature and scope of imitation in the visual arts by bringing to bear a global perspective that reveals the ubiquity and homology of the practices of imitation from within the various historical and geographical positions investigated in these essays.
@article{ duro_why_2014,
  title = {Why {Imitation}, and {Why} {Global}?},
  volume = {37},
  issn = {01416790},
  url = {http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=97504295&site=ehost-live},
  doi = {10.1111/1467-8365.12106},
  abstract = {Despite a growing body of recent work, imitation in art is still commonly confused with the practice of copying to the detriment of the many kinds of replication that are thereby negatively compared with notions of originality and authenticity. From antiquity to the present, the theory and practice of imitation has been central to the construction of art through many forms of repetition, such as appropriation, replication, quotation, reproduction, citation and reference. Yet it is the act of repetition that confers the quality of originality and authenticity on the model in the first place – a gesture of demarcation that serves to establish a hierarchy of value between copy and model and reinforce the perception that all forms of imitation necessarily run counter to the ideas of innovation or emulation. The present collection challenges these assumptions, and seeks to reveal the nature and scope of imitation in the visual arts by bringing to bear a global perspective that reveals the ubiquity and homology of the practices of imitation from within the various historical and geographical positions investigated in these essays.},
  number = {4},
  urldate = {2015-09-26TZ},
  journal = {Art History},
  author = {Duro, Paul},
  month = {September},
  year = {2014},
  keywords = {AESTHETICS -- History, AI Weiwei, 1957- -- Exhibitions, ART theory, CREATION (Literary, artistic, etc.), CREATIVE ability, IMITATION in art, INSPIRATION in art, MIMESIS in art},
  pages = {606--627}
}
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