Curricula are Social Processes. Easthope, R. In Barton, L., Meighan, R., & Walker, S., editors, Schooling, Ideology and the Curriculum, pages 153–167. Routledge, London, 2012.
Curricula are Social Processes [link]Paper  abstract   bibtex   
During the 1960s a number of curriculum innovations were presented to schools: French for primary schools; Nuffield science; Mathematics for the Majority; the Humanities Curriculum Project and Man, a Course of Study (MACOS). Those who were given, or took upon themselves, the task of disseminating these innovations soon became aware that curriculum content was inextricably linked to the social processes of interaction between teachers and between teachers and pupils. The implementation of a new curriculum subject implied more than merely a change in what was taught, it also implied a change in social relationships. Hamilton 2 expressed it in these terms:the introduction of integrated studies is not merely equivalent to introducing a new syllabus but implies a radical change of emphasis in the organisational context and thinking of secondary education . .. simple questions of content cannot be separated from complex questions of grouping children by ability, from questions of 'responsibility' and authority, or, even from questions of school democracy.
@incollection{easthope_curricula_2012,
	address = {London},
	title = {Curricula are {Social} {Processes}},
	isbn = {978-0-203-12886-2},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203128862},
	abstract = {During the 1960s a number of curriculum innovations were presented to schools: French for primary schools; Nuffield science; Mathematics for the Majority; the Humanities Curriculum Project and Man, a Course of Study (MACOS). Those who were given, or took upon themselves, the task of disseminating these innovations soon became aware that curriculum content was inextricably linked to the social processes of interaction between teachers and between teachers and pupils. The implementation of a new curriculum subject implied more than merely a change in what was taught, it also implied a change in social relationships. Hamilton 2 expressed it in these terms:the introduction of integrated studies is not merely equivalent to introducing a new syllabus but implies a radical change of emphasis in the organisational context and thinking of secondary education . .. simple questions of content cannot be separated from complex questions of grouping children by ability, from questions of 'responsibility' and authority, or, even from questions of school democracy.},
	language = {eng},
	booktitle = {Schooling, {Ideology} and the {Curriculum}},
	publisher = {Routledge},
	author = {Easthope, Roland},
	editor = {Barton, Len and Meighan, Roland and Walker, Stephen},
	year = {2012},
	pages = {153--167}
}
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