Einstein's violin: a conductor's notes on music, physics, and social change. Eger, J. & Einstein, A. Jeremy P. Tarcher\slash Penguin, New York, NY, USA, 2005.
abstract   bibtex   
In Einstein's Violin, Eger distills more than half a century of personal experience and what it has taught him about how music is uncannily similar in its design to the concepts of `string theory' that have become overwhelmingly popular in today's theoretical physics. Eger deals with how music relates not only to the physical world, but to the social one as well: He was among the first classical performers to see music as a force for change, leading him to cross battle lines in the Middle East, to perform fusion concerts with musicians such as John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and to become a voice for social advocacy from the hearing rooms of the House Un-American Activities Committee to the stage of Harlem's Apollo Theater.\par Eger's life is a social and artistic tour through music and science of the twentieth century. In Einstein's Violin, readers encounter portraits of figures including Leonard Bernstein, David Bohm, Albert Einstein, Queen Noor al Hussein, and Eleanor Roosevelt. Eger also probes the origins of ancient music in the hands of the Hebrews. Egyptians, Hindus, ancient Chinese, and the schools of Pythagoras to plumb the sources of this socially and physically unifying language of the universe.
@Book{Eger:2005:EVC,
  author =       "Joseph Eger and Albert Einstein",
  title =        "{Einstein}'s violin: a conductor's notes on music,
                 physics, and social change",
  publisher =    "Jeremy P. Tarcher\slash Penguin",
  address =      "New York, NY, USA",
  pages =        "xiv + 417",
  year =         "2005",
  ISBN =         "1-58542-388-2",
  ISBN-13 =      "978-1-58542-388-0",
  LCCN =         "ML3800 .E3 2005",
  bibdate =      "Thu Jan 25 18:50:57 MST 2007",
  bibsource =    "http://www.math.utah.edu/pub/tex/bib/einstein.bib;
                 z3950.loc.gov:7090/Voyager",
  abstract =     "In Einstein's Violin, Eger distills more
                 than half a century of personal experience and what it
                 has taught him about how music is uncannily similar in
                 its design to the concepts of `string theory' that have
                 become overwhelmingly popular in today's theoretical
                 physics. Eger deals with how music relates not only to
                 the physical world, but to the social one as well: He
                 was among the first classical performers to see music
                 as a force for change, leading him to cross battle
                 lines in the Middle East, to perform fusion concerts
                 with musicians such as John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and to
                 become a voice for social advocacy from the hearing
                 rooms of the House Un-American Activities Committee to
                 the stage of Harlem's Apollo Theater.\par

                 Eger's life is a social and artistic tour through music
                 and science of the twentieth century. In
                 Einstein's Violin, readers encounter
                 portraits of figures including Leonard Bernstein, David
                 Bohm, Albert Einstein, Queen Noor al Hussein, and
                 Eleanor Roosevelt. Eger also probes the origins of
                 ancient music in the hands of the Hebrews. Egyptians,
                 Hindus, ancient Chinese, and the schools of Pythagoras
                 to plumb the sources of this socially and physically
                 unifying language of the universe.",
  acknowledgement = ack-nhfb,
  subject =      "Music; Philosophy and aesthetics",
  tableofcontents = "1: How I came to write this book \\
                 2: Guns in my face: music at my back \\
                 3: How it all began: back to 1951 \\
                 4: Fun in music and physics \\
                 5: What it's like to be a musician \\
                 6: What is music? \\
                 7: Songs of praise \\
                 8: Music as context \\
                 9: Music's dagger \\
                 10: Personal wars \\
                 11: Conductors, consistency, and change \\
                 12: The audience revolution \\
                 13: Beethoven, my hero \\
                 14: Beethoven's music \\
                 15: Fantastique: Hector Berlioz (1803--1869) \\
                 16: Einstein the person \\
                 17: Music and science \\
                 18: The quantum revolution \\
                 19: The science of music: the music of science \\
                 20: Superstring theory \\
                 21: Race toward the goal \\
                 22: Superstrings: my neighbor's territory",
}
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