Plasmonic Enhancement or Energy Transfer? On the Luminescence of Gold-, Silver-, and Lanthanide-Doped Silicate Glasses and Its Potential for Light-Emitting Devices. Eichelbaum, M. & Rademann, K. Advanced Functional Materials, 19(13):2045--2052, 2009.
Plasmonic Enhancement or Energy Transfer? On the Luminescence of Gold-, Silver-, and Lanthanide-Doped Silicate Glasses and Its Potential for Light-Emitting Devices [link]Paper  doi  abstract   bibtex   
With the technique of synchrotron X-ray activation, molecule-like, non-plasmonic gold and silver particles in soda-lime silicate glasses can be generated. The luminescence energy transfer between these species and lanthanide(III) ions is studied. As a result, a significant lanthanide luminescence enhancement by a factor of up to 250 under non-resonant UV excitation is observed. The absence of a distinct gold and silver plasmon resonance absorption, respectively, the missing nanoparticle signals in previous SAXS and TEM experiments, the unaltered luminescence lifetime of the lanthanide ions compared to the non-enhanced case, and an excitation maximum at 300-350 nm (equivalent to the absorption range of small noble metal particles) indicate unambiguously that the observed enhancement is due to a classical energy transfer between small noble metal particles and lanthanide ions, and not to a plasmonic field enhancement effect. It is proposed that very small, molecule-like noble metal particles (such as dimers, trimers, and tetramers) first absorb the excitation light, undergo a singlet-triplet intersystem crossing, and finally transfer the energy to an excited multiplet state of adjacent lanthanide(III) ions. X-ray lithographic microstructuring and excitation with a commercial UV LED show the potential of the activated glass samples as bright light-emitting devices with tunable emission colors.
@article{eichelbaum_plasmonic_2009,
	title = {Plasmonic {Enhancement} or {Energy} {Transfer}? {On} the {Luminescence} of {Gold}-, {Silver}-, and {Lanthanide}-{Doped} {Silicate} {Glasses} and {Its} {Potential} for {Light}-{Emitting} {Devices}},
	volume = {19},
	shorttitle = {Plasmonic {Enhancement} or {Energy} {Transfer}?},
	url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.200801892},
	doi = {10.1002/adfm.200801892},
	abstract = {With the technique of synchrotron X-ray activation, molecule-like, non-plasmonic gold and silver particles in soda-lime silicate glasses can be generated. The luminescence energy transfer between these species and lanthanide(III) ions is studied. As a result, a significant lanthanide luminescence enhancement by a factor of up to 250 under non-resonant UV excitation is observed. The absence of a distinct gold and silver plasmon resonance absorption, respectively, the missing nanoparticle signals in previous SAXS and TEM experiments, the unaltered luminescence lifetime of the lanthanide ions compared to the non-enhanced case, and an excitation maximum at 300-350 nm (equivalent to the absorption range of small noble metal particles) indicate unambiguously that the observed enhancement is due to a classical energy transfer between small noble metal particles and lanthanide ions, and not to a plasmonic field enhancement effect. It is proposed that very small, molecule-like noble metal particles (such as dimers, trimers, and tetramers) first absorb the excitation light, undergo a singlet-triplet intersystem crossing, and finally transfer the energy to an excited multiplet state of adjacent lanthanide(III) ions. X-ray lithographic microstructuring and excitation with a commercial UV LED show the potential of the activated glass samples as bright light-emitting devices with tunable emission colors.},
	number = {13},
	urldate = {2009-11-07TZ},
	journal = {Advanced Functional Materials},
	author = {Eichelbaum, Maik and Rademann, Klaus},
	year = {2009},
	keywords = {energy transfer, gold, lanthanides, photoluminescence, silver},
	pages = {2045--2052}
}

Downloads: 0